Marketing Students Attend New York Business Meeting

Meeting with Scott Pelley at CBS was just one of the highlights of a weeklong “business meeting” in New York.

Meeting with Scott Pelley at CBS was just one of the highlights of a weeklong “business meeting” in New York.

MEETING WITH SCOTT PELLEY AT CBS WAS JUST ONE of the highlights of a weeklong “business meeting” in New York this spring as part of the marketing course, “Gateways to World markets.” During the trip they met and discussed current brand marketing and communication trends and strategies with top executives from global brands such as American Express, CBS, Sports Illustrated, Ogilvy & Mather advertising, L’Oreal, Chobani Yogurt, Jet Blue and Yelp.

Football Team Succeeding in Classroom and on Field

Defensive back Jerrodd Williams graduated this spring.

Defensive back Jerrodd Williams graduated this spring.

CLEMSON’S FOOTBALL TEAM HAS FINISHED THE LAST TWO SEASONS WITH A top-10 final ranking in the USA Today coaches’ poll. The NCAA Academic Performance Public Recognition Awards released in May show that the team is performing just as well in the classroom. For the fourth consecutive year, Clemson ranks among the top 10 percent of all FBS football Bowl Subdivision) programs nationally in Academic Progress Rate (APR) score.

Clemson is one of only five FBS programs ranked in the top 10 percent each of the last four years, joining Boise State, Duke, Northwestern and Rutgers. Clemson is the only FBS program nationally to finish each of the last three seasons in the top 25 of both the AP and USA Today polls on the field, and in the top 10 percent of APR scores in the classroom.

Excellence in the Academic Progress Rate has translated into a strong graduation rate for the Clemson football program. Over the last four years, 67 of Clemson’s 72 seniors have earned degrees, 93.1 percent. The APR is a metric developed to track the academic achievement of teams each academic term. Each studentathlete receiving athletically related financial aid earns one retention point for staying in school and one eligibility point for being academically eligible. A team’s total points are divided by points possible and then multiplied by one thousand to equal the team’s APR score.

Graduates Commissioned as Second Lieutenants

SHAROSCA MACK ’14, AN ECONOMICS MAJOR FROM LORIS, WAS commissioned as a second lieutenant in the Army at a joint Army and Air Force ceremony on May 8. Nineteen students received commissions into the U.S. Army and 11 received commissions into the U.S. Air Force. The ceremony featured guest speaker Col. (Ret.) Rick Schwartz M ’95. A former Army ROTC instructor, he retired last year after 29 years in the Army.

Following the commissioning ceremony, the new lieutenants participated in a Silver Dollar Salute ceremony at Military Heritage Plaza. The ceremony marks the first salute the new officer receives from an enlisted service member. As a sign of mutual respect, the officer presents the enlisted member with a silver dollar.

Clemson Lands $11 Million Grant

CLEMSON HAS BEEN AWARDED $11 MILLION to expand a bioengineering center that helps mentor junior faculty members as they research how labgrown tissue can treat some of the world’s most debilitating diseases, ranging from heart disease to spinal cord injuries.

The money comes from a National Institutes of Health (NIH) program that supports the Centers of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE) nationwide, including Clemson’s South Carolina Bioengineering Center of Regeneration and Formation of Tissues (SC BioCRAFT). The grant is the largest from the NIH in the University’s history; it brings the total NIH funding for the center to $20.3 million.

The grant will pay for maintaining and upgrading state-of-the-art facilities and provide funds for five junior faculty to begin their research, said Naren Vyavahare, the SC BioCRAFT director and Hunter Endowed Chair of bioengineering.

“This is seed money,” he said. “The whole idea behind the center is to fund and mentor junior faculty and make them successful. When they get their own major grant, we graduate them and bring new people in.”

Clemson researchers will collaborate with Roger Markwald of the Medical University of South Carolina, who is a co-principal investigator on the grant. Senior investigators Thomas Borg and Mark Kindy, both of MUSC, will provide biology expertise.

Collaboration with Adobe to Support Next-Generation Creativity

Jim Holscher, Adobe’s vice president of education field operation.

Keith Spencer, Senior account executive, Adobe Education

CLEMSON AND ADOBE ARE WORKING TOGETHER to enable campus wide access to Adobe’s Creative Cloud tools for all faculty, staff and students. Creative Cloud is a platform for making, sharing and delivering creative work through design, Web, video, collaboration and digital-imaging tools.

In addition, Adobe will invest in an innovative, state-of-the-art Adobe Digital Studio in Cooper Library that will serve as a teaching, training and collaboration environment to support next-generation learning and creativity. This joint effort includes software training support, access to the Digital Publishing Suite platform to produce academic and professional publications, and on-campus student internship programs sponsored by Adobe.

Through this collaboration, Adobe will help Clemson become a flagship institution for developing new applications for digital publishing and content creation across campus.

“Ubiquitous access to Adobe’s Creative Cloud will transform and elevate the quality, innovation and creativity of our communication practices at every level and across all media,” said David Blakesley, Campbell Chair in Technical Communication and professor of English. “Clemson is already known as a leader in communication across the curriculum, so this new implementation raises the bar for everyone.”

“Today’s students want to make a difference in the world, and they want to do it using the technology tools they’ve grown up with,” said Jim Holscher, Adobe’s vice president of education field operation. “Through our work with Clemson University, we are providing faculty, staff and students with the right tools to successfully create and communicate their ideas while mastering essential communication skills that will increase their marketability to potential employers.”

Cadence Count

The Will to Lead campaign, by the numbers

In 2012, Clemson surpassed the $600 million goal of the Will to Lead campaign. In an act of optimism and confidence, the campaign leadership and Board of Trustees decided to dream big and raise the challenge to a new goal of $1 billion. Here are a few illustrations of the progress we’ve made, thanks to your generosity, as well as what still lies ahead to be accomplished.

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In These Hills

International teachers learn and teach

Richard Balikoowa from Uganda was one of 16 teachers from seven different countries who studied on campus and taught in local schools from January through May. They are part of the International Leaders in Education Program, a professional exchange program funded by a subgrant from the International Research and Exchanges Board (IREX), which is funded by the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. The teachers completed an on-campus academic program with some of Clemson’s School of Education faculty, and then interned with a partner teacher at Riverside Middle, Liberty Middle and Seneca High.

As part of this program, which is in its sixth year at Clemson, the teachers engage in formal and informal cultural activities in which they learn about American culture and share about their own. Teacher Fellows go through a yearlong selection process; they are nominated by their own country, approved through that country’s American embassy and local Fulbright commission, and screened through the U.S. State Department and IREX. Clemson is one of four universities selected to host the group.

Clemson team selected for Solar Decathlon

Clemson's Solar Decathlon team

Clemson’s Solar Decathlon team

The U.S. Department of Energy selected a Clemson team to compete in the Solar Decathlon 2015. Clemson is one of 20 colleges and universities across the country and around the world that will now begin the nearly two-year process of building solar-powered houses that are affordable, innovative and highly energy efficient.

“We are honored and excited to participate in the Solar Decathlon 2015,” said Akel Kahera, associate dean for Clemson’s College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities. “This competition offers our students a one-of-a-kind learning and training experience that helps students excel once they enter the clean energy industry.”

Over the coming months, the Solar Decathlon teams will design, construct and test their houses before reassembling them at the Solar Decathlon 2015 competition site in Irvine, Calif. As part of the Solar Decathlon, teams compete in 10 different contests, ranging from architecture and engineering to home appliance performance, while gaining valuable hands-on experience.

In fall 2015, the student teams will showcase their solar-powered houses at the competition site, providing free public tours of renewable energy systems and energy-efficient technologies, products and appliances that today are helping homeowners nationwide save money by saving energy. The solar-powered houses will represent a diverse range of design approaches; building technologies; target markets; and geographic locations, climates and regions, including urban, suburban and rural settings.

The Solar Decathlon helps demonstrate how energy-efficient and renewable energy technologies and design save money and energy while protecting local communities and boosting economic growth.
To view a video about the Solar Decathlon, go to clemson.edu/ clemsonworld and click on “In These Hills.”

Clemson partners in national hub for genetics research

President Clements presents Self Regional’s Jim Pfeiffer with a bowl crafted from a cedar tree at Fort Hill, the historic home of John C. Calhoun and Thomas G. Clemson.

President Clements presents Self Regional’s Jim Pfeiffer with a bowl crafted from a cedar tree at Fort Hill, the historic home of John C.  Calhoun and Thomas G. Clemson.

In February, Clemson, the Greenwood Genetic Center and Self Regional Healthcare announced a new partnership that will establish formal collaboration among genetic researchers and Clemson faculty. Self Regional Healthcare will support Clemson’s Center for Human Genetics with a gift of $5.6 million over three years. The gift consists of an initial contribution of $2 million for the center’s facilities and a subsequent contribution of $3.6 million to support research in genetics and human diagnostics at the facility located on the Greenwood Genetic Center campus.

“Today’s announcement will create a new pipeline for genetic research,” said John Pillman, chair of the Self Regional board of trustees. “The collaboration of these three partners will ultimately connect genetic therapeutics research to patients.”

Steve Skinner, director of the Greenwood Genetic Center, said such collaborations are crucial in turning research advances into clinically available therapies for patients, not only in Greenwood and across South Carolina, but globally. “This collaboration is a major step forward for patients as we combine the resources and strengths of each institution: Self’s commitment to patient care, Clemson’s expertise in basic scientific research and our experience with genetic disorders and treatment.”
Self Regional and the Genetic Center have had an affiliation agreement since 1975 with the Genetic Center’s clinical faculty serving as the Department of Medical Genetics for Self Regional.

President Clements said the announcement brings us a step closer to moving basic discoveries in human genetics from a research environment to a clinical setting, where they can be used to diagnose and treat real human disorders. “Clemson is proud to be part of this important collaborative effort, and we’re grateful to Self Regional Healthcare for its support of our research efforts at the Greenwood Genetic Center.”

The center will address research and clinical opportunities in human diagnostics and epigenetic therapeutics advancing personalized medicine for intellectual and developmental disabilities, autism, cancer, diabetes, heart disease and disorders of the immune and nervous systems. Specific research will include molecular diagnostics and therapeutics, bioinformatics and computational/systems biology.

Self Regional Healthcare, as a research and lead health care partner, will support hospital-based clinical trials and collaborate in designated research activities. This marks Clemson’s third significant development at the Greenwood Genetic Center. In June 2013, Clemson announced it would expand its genetics programs, create an internationally competitive research and development team, and expand research capabilities at the Greenwood Genetic Center’s J.C. Self Institute through the Center for Human Genetics, a 17,000-square-foot research and education center in human genetics. And in November, Clemson established the Self Family Foundation Endowed Chair in Human Genetics, jointly funded by the Self Family Foundation and the state of South Carolina.

Ballato selected for class of ’39 award

John Ballato 2013 recipient of the Class of ’39 Award.

John Ballato 2013 recipient of the Class of ’39 Award.

With the increasing popularity of Sci-Fi movies, it’s no surprise that lasers conjure up images of futuristic adventures in outer space. But materials science and engineering professor John Ballato’s work in fiber optics isn’t happening in a galaxy far, far away — it’s all happening right here in Clemson.

The 2013 recipient of the Class of ’39 Award, Ballato is director of the Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET). His research in glass and specialty fiber has made seemingly fictitious concepts a reality. “It sounds very Star Trek-ish, but the military has lasers deployed around the world to shoot down a variety of threats,” Ballato said, “everything from missiles to RPGs.”

Although Ballato and his team don’t make the lasers that are sent to the battlefield, they do help develop the fiber optics that go inside them. The program’s success in the field of specialty fiber has enabled Ballato to work closely with the U.S. Department of Defense Joint Technology Office, which has invested more than $10 million in COMSET over the past eight years.

Ballato moved to Clemson in 1997 and worked with other researchers to start an optics program, no easy task for junior faculty members. “Doing optical fiber research is extremely expensive,” he said. “The equipment that you need is big, complex and dangerous.”

But a confluence of events fell into the team’s favor. The dot-com boom turned into the dot-com bust in the late 1990s, leaving a glut of fiber optic cable that no one wanted. But Ballato and his team knew there was more research to be done. They quickly found an underserved sector, a “sandbox” where no one else was playing, he said. “The Department of Defense was clamoring for specialty fiber,” he said. “They couldn’t get any because it was all going to communications.”

It was a perfect fit. The research had to be done onshore for security reasons, Ballato said, and the Department of Defense was a client with deep pockets. “There was nobody else talking to them,” he said. “Everybody else had moved on http://creative.clemson.edu/clemsonworld/2014/05/hills/to other things, and we rode that wave in fiber for 10 years, through two wars and a staggering amount of investment.”

Ballato said COMSET partners with companies to pitch programs to the Department of Defense. “Clemson is actually pretty unique nationally in the sense that we go from ‘dirt to shirt,’” he said. “We model it, we design it. We study new materials. We make the glasses. We draw the fiber. We build the lasers for them at a prototypic level. That’s extremely valuable for our partners. It’s a one-stop shop for them.”

Ballato served as the interim vice president for research and associate vice president for research and economic development, where he championed Clemson’s advanced materials related research and economic development. His achievements speak volumes, but this award may be the most meaningful. Ballato was chosen by his peers to represent the highest achievement of service to the University, the student body and the larger community.

As the 2013 winner of the Class of ‘39 Award, Ballato’s name will be engraved in stone next to 24 past winners. The Class of 1939 established the Award for Excellence in 1989 to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the class and to recognize and inspire faculty service above and beyond expectations.

In March, President Clements announced that Ballato would take on additional duties as the University’s vice president for economic development.

Honoring Sacrifice

Clemson’s Air Force ROTC detachment gathered in March to send Lieutenant Colonel Tom von Kaenel on a 120-day bicycle journey to Juneau, Alaska, to raise awareness of the sacrifices of service members, veterans and their families since 9-11. Kaenel is the founder of Sea2Sea, a military nonprofit that organizes bicycling events across the country, partnering with other nonprofits and local organizations. During the memorial service held that day, Clemson cadets read the names of South Carolinians who lost their lives in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Nanoparticles, Big Ideas

Apparao (Raja) Rao

Apparao (Raja) Rao

Although these images can easily be mistaken for abstract art, they are indeed high resolution transmission electron microscope images of unique nanostructures explored by R.A. Bowen Professor of Physics Apparao (RAJA) Rao and his team at the Clemson Nanomaterials Center.

The honeycomb-like structure (in purple) with rows of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal fashion forms the basis of a graphene layer — the quantum building block for buckyballs, carbon nanotubes and graphite. Supported by a $1.2 million grant from the National Science Foundation, Rao and his team have begun to chip away at reinventing energy storage by developing a cost-effective and scalable way to produce carbon nanomaterials. While energy is one of the focus areas, Rao’s team is also working on understanding the fundamental implications of nanomaterials on the physiological response.

Shown in the image (orange) is a silver nanoparticle coated with serum albumin, whose modified structure could be used to generate nanoparticles that can deliver useful drugs without being engulfed by the immune system.

Determined Spirits

Dan Stanzione, Charles Dalton, Thomas Alexander and Steve Griffith

Dan Stanzione, Charles Dalton, Thomas Alexander and Steve Griffith

Clemson has graduated many an ambitious man and woman. Each year, the Alumni Association recognizes a select number of those who have demonstrated an extraordinary level of commitment to its three tiers of evaluation: enhancing the value of the University for future generations; professional and public service; and personal accomplishments that serve as a model for present and future Clemson students.

Whether in the House or in the boardroom, the classroom or the CEO suite, the 2014 Distinguished Service Award recipients have always displayed a drive to do better, to be better for both themselves and for the sake of giving back to their Clemson community.

Thomas C. Alexander ’78

The world of politics has a special draw for Sen. Thomas Alexander. Something in these hills spurred him on to a political career that began with Walhalla City Council in 1981 after completing his bachelor’s degree in economics. He was elected to the S.C. House of Representatives in 1986 and served for two terms before becoming the senator for S.C. Senate District One.

Chair of the Senate Labor, Commerce and Industry Committee, as well as the Public Utility Review Committee, Alexander also chairs the Health and Human Services Subcommittee and serves on the Senate Finance Committee, the Medical Affairs Committee, the Banking and Insurance Committee and the Joint Bond Review Committee. He holds multiple leadership responsibilities in the National Conference of State Legislatures.

Alexander has been a strong supporter of Clemson through legislative initiatives to provide funding for Public Service Activities, the Wind Turbine Drivetrain Testing facility, new research facilities through the S.C. Research University Infrastructure Act and endowed faculty positions through the SmartState Center of Economic Excellence program.

Owner of Alexander Office Supply, located in Oconee County, Alexander has received the Franklin G. Mason Award from the S.C. Lions Foundation, the S.C. Chamber of Commerce Business Advocate Award, the S.C. Commission for the Blind Foundation Legislator of the Year Award and an honorary doctorate of humanities from the Medical University of South Carolina.

Charles E. Dalton ’64

For Charles Dalton, Clemson always has been a family affair. He grew up in Pickens, attending campus events with his family before enrolling as a student. His three children followed suit.

For more than 35 years, he has been a loyal donor to Clemson University and for 40 years he has been an IPTAY member, recently serving as president. He has served on the University’s Board of Visitors, the Clemson University Foundation Board of Directors and the Alumni Association Board, and gave a major gift to the WestZone project.

But Dalton’s leadership has been evident in his community and throughout the state as well. He has served on the boards of organizations ranging from Upstate Alliance of South Carolina and Cannon Memorial Hospital to the Palmetto Conservation Center and the Peace Center for the Performing Arts. Recognized as the S.C. Development Ally of the Year, he was presented the S.C. Individual Initiative Award by the governor and the Outstanding Community Service Award by the Better Business Bureau.

After co-owning and operating the family’s furniture store, Dalton’s Furniture and Carpet, he became president and CEO of Blue Ridge Electric Cooperative in 1982, then added the roles of president and CEO for Blue Ridge Security Solutions in 1992.

His love of Clemson dance weekends during his college years was the impetus for him to develop Blue Ridge Fest, an employee-driven event hosted by Blue Ridge Electric Cooperative that features live performances by beach music entertainers.

Steve C. Griffith Jr. ’54

Steve Griffith knows power — both at the capital and in the grid. After devoting his first few post-graduation years to practicing law in Newberry and then serving in the S.C. House of Representatives, Griffith became part of Duke Power. He retired as general counsel and vice chair in 1997 after more than 30 years with the company.

In 1988, he was appointed by President Ronald Reagan to chair the Presidential Commission on Catastrophic Nuclear Accidents. He also served on the board of directors for Nuclear Mutual Limited from 1988 to 1997, and chaired the American Bar Association section of Public Utility, Communications and Transportation Law in 1994.

Affectionately known as the “Father of the Rowing Team,” Griffith provided support to start the Clemson Crew men’s and women’s rowing teams. Having served on the Board of Visitors and the Clemson University Foundation Board of Directors, Griffith led a campaign among Clemson alumni at Duke Power for donations that were matched by the company. These gifts made possible the establishment of an endowed chair in engineering.

In 1989, he chaired the Arts and Science Council Campaign in Charlotte, which raised nearly $2 million. He helped establish the Lawyers Volunteer Program for the Charlotte Bar Association, and in 1995, Griffith received the Robinson Award, Duke Power’s highest honor, for his work to help establish a homeless shelter.

Daniel C. Stanzione Sr. ’67, M ’68, PhD ’72

Daniel Stanzione is a Tiger three times over. An Air Force cadet and a member of Delta Kappa Alpha fraternity, he graduated with a degree in electrical engineering, then stayed at Clemson to complete a master’s degree in environmental systems engineering and a Ph.D. in electrical and computer engineering. He credits Professor Maurice Wolla for introducing him to his first small computer and preparing him for the professional world.

President emeritus of Bell Laboratories, Stanzione began his career at the company in 1972 and worked his way up through the ranks, becoming president in 1995 as well as COO of Lucent Technologies in 1997. A Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, he has published a multitude of papers on computer simulation, microprocessors and software designs. He continues to serve as a director or adviser for several technology companies.

Elected to the Thomas Green Clemson Academy of Engineers and a member of the President’s Advisory Board, Stanzione established an endowment benefiting women majoring in engineering. He is a founding member of the Clemson Leadership Circle and Barker Scholars Endowment, and a member of the John C. Calhoun Society and the Clemson Legacy Society. Stanzione serves on the Clemson University Foundation board of directors, and the corporate and foundation relations committee of The Will to Lead capital campaign.

To see videos that capture the essence of these four determined spirits, go to
clemson.edu/clemsonworld and click on “In These Hills.