Alumni survey: You spoke, and we listened.

Alumni pie charts numbersEvery three to four years, we survey alumni to gauge how we’re doing as an alumni association. We look to see how you feel about the University — about choosing to attend, your experience as a student and as an alumnus — and what impacts your current opinion of Clemson. We also want to discover what you need from us and how we can better serve you.

We use this information as we plan for the future, as we decide which programs need to change and how can better serve you, the alumni of Clemson.

This year, we sent out more than 65,000 surveys, and 3,782 of you responded. Here is just a snapshot of the survey results.

SATISFACTION INDEX: 91%

The “Satisfaction Index” is calculated by averaging responses to these four questions, with the result being expressed as a percentage.

• How would you rate your decision to attend Clemson?
• How often do you promote Clemson to others?
• Which of the following best describes your experiences as an alumnus/a?
• Which of the following best describes your overall current opinion of Clemson?

While the national average is 80 percent, Clemson’s number has moved up from 89 percent in 2012.

When asked what impacts their overall current opinion of the University, alumni ranked these items highest:

• Value and respect for degree
• History/tradition
• Accomplishments of students
• Providing scholarships
• Campus aesthetics (e.g., buildings, grounds, etc.)

Modes of communication

Alumni rated email, Clemson World magazine and the Echo (electronic newsletter) as the three most important communication methods. Younger alumni feel that we’re not using email as effectively as possible. We also need to improve in the areas of invitations to University and alumni activities, and to communicate more effectively about services and benefits of being an alumnus.

The importance of alumni involvement

When asked, “How important is it for you and alumni in general to do the following and how well does Clemson do at supporting alumni in doing them?” alumni ranked four areas of alumni involvement as “very important.” The top two were serving as ambassadors by promoting Clemson to others and identifying job opportunities for graduates. In both of those areas, we need to provide more support for alumni. Third ranked was recruiting students, and fourth was providing financial support for Clemson (e.g., donations). Alumni feel Clemson supports them well in those roles.

Alumni Services needs

Alumni rated the following services as most needed:

• Networking
• Career search strategies
• Career planning, mapping and goal setting

Not surprisingly, all three were ranked higher by younger alumni.

We’re moving forward.

Thank you for letting us know what you think. We have already begun planning in the areas you’ve told us need improvement, and we’ll communicate with you about the process and ask for feedback.

 

McMillan named Alumni Master Teacher

Kerri-McMillan-with-students

Students chose Kerri D. McMillan as the 2016 Alumni Master Teacher. McMillan is a senior lecturer in the finance department of the College of Business and teaches courses in investment analysis, risk management, insurance and personal finance to 150 upper-level undergraduates each semester. The award for outstanding undergraduate classroom instruction is presented each spring to a faculty member nominated by the student body and selected by the Student Alumni Council.

“I am so honored to be the recipient of this award. I was still so excited Monday night, I could hardly sleep,” said McMillan. “I especially enjoyed hearing what my students had to say about me. I truly love my field of finance and teaching our Clemson students. When I pull into Sirrine Hall parking lot, I count my blessings. I love every day I am in the classroom.”

Alumni Master Teacher Award co-chair Parkwood Griffith said McMillan’s penchant for instilling passion in her students where it might not have been before and showing them the real-world applications for what they learn in her class helped set her nomination apart. “Students felt like she encouraged and prepared them about finance in the real world,” said Griffith.

McMillan received a bachelor’s degree in marketing from Southeastern Louisiana University and an MBA from the University of South Carolina. Before coming to Clemson, she spent a decade as a portfolio manager and securities analyst for an investment management company in Greenville.

Clemson Club Events: Baltimore/Washington, D.C., Club

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Members of the Baltimore/Washington, D.C., Clemson Club had the unique opportunity to go bowling at the Truman Bowling Alley Washington, D.C., on February 10, 2016.  Once housed in the White House where the present-day Situation Room is located, the alley is now located in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building (EEOB).  Thanks to Mike Palmer ’97, these Tigers enjoyed a tour of the EEOB and two hours of bowling on the most historic and exclusive lanes in the world.

 

Pictured: Back row: Mike Palmer ’97, Mark Derrick ’91, David Rochester ’68, Catherine Rochester, Ken Bowen ’86, P’18, P’18, Michael Coakley ’91, Spencer Neal ‘95. Front row: Rachael Neal ’97, Elizabeth Jackson ‘06, Elizabeth Bowen P’18, P’18, Beth Coakley ’93 and Holly Cirrito ’95.

Photo from the club’s 6 Degrees of Clemson event:

Six Degrees_Group Picture.JPG

Fore more information about the Baltimore/Washington, D.C., Club, go to www.clemsonclub.org/.

Bowl games bring out the Orange

Orange Bowl Feeding 6The Orange Bowl and the National Championship this season put the spotlight on Clemson Clubs in the Miami and Phoenix areas. Both cities turned orange as Clemson fans showed up in mass for the games.

Orange-bedecked fans also visited the Grand Canyon in droves, making it look like it should be a Clemson attraction, rather than a national park.

Clubs in both cities, with the help of the Alumni Association, organized an array of activities that included service projects, tailgates, pep rallies and other pre-game events. Clemson alumni and fans so impressed the chair of the Arizona Sports and Tourism Authority that he sent a letter to South Carolina newspapers.

“Clemson may not have won the title, but the Tigers and their followers left a lasting and positive impression in the Valley of the Sun this week,” he wrote. “Local residents, business owners and dignitaries were so impressed with the way Clemson fans conducted themselves during the team’s first trip to the desert.”

Clemson fans are confident that it won’t be the last.

Alumni Authors

Clemson Tigers can be found in every profession, and many are published authors. Here is a short, but not exhaustive, list of alumni authors and some of their books that may pique your interest.


Scott AbellaScott Abella M ’02

Conserving America’s National Parks (CreateSpace) shares the status of conservation challenges and successes in America’s 408 national parks.

 

 

JohnSeketaJohn Seketa HA ’13

Clemson Through the Eyes of the Tiger (John106Publishing) documents the grit and sweat that goes into becoming the Clemson Tiger mascot. More than 70 people have donned the suit that brings stadiums of cheering fans to their feet each season.

 


McCarty.Hubbard.QuisenberryBert McCarty ’81, PhD ’86; L. Ray Hubbard Jr. ’82, ’83, PhD ’13; Virgil Quisenberry, professor emeritus of soil physics

Applied Soil Physical Properties, Drainage, and Irrigation Strategies (Springer). This practical guide aims to demystify the complicated math used in soil physics formulas.

 


Whittle_Growing Up ClemsonJerry Whittle ’79

Growing up in Clemson: Blessed in the Fifties (Amazon Digital Services) details the experiences of growing up in a small college town from 1950-1960.

 

 


Robert ElderRobert Elder ’03, M ’05

The Sacred Mirror: Evangelicalism, Honor, and Identity in the Deep South, 1790-1860 (University of North Carolina Press) challenges the traditional interpretations of the rise of evangelicals in the South, including in the Methodist, Baptist and Presbyterian denominations.

 


David DownsDavid J. Downs ’99

Alms: Charity, Reward, and Atonement in Early Christianity (Baylor University Press) looks at how care for the poor was also an atonement for sin in early Christianity.

 

 


Bradley_Wilderness and DisasterDavid E. Bradley M ’88

Wilderness and Disaster Survival Guide (self published) tackles survival scenarios from animal dangers to natural and man-made disasters.

 

 

 

WOODWALKEREmily Benson Martin ’10 M ’12
Woodwalker (HarperCollins) is an epic fantasy about the adventures of Mae who is exiled from her home and her people. As Mae embarks on her own, she comes across three out-of-place strangers and risks death to help a deposed queen regain her throne. Read an excerpt here.

Stuckey celebrates 100th birthday with help from local Clemson club

Print 100th Birthday -70Al Stuckey ’36 of Hickory, N.C., hit an important milestone on October 31, and his family, friends and the Clemson family made sure it was celebrated in style. Stuckey, who holds the record for the living alumnus with the most consecutive years of giving to Clemson (currently at 81 years), turned 100 this year, and he did it surrounded by neighbors, friends, four generations of family and members of the Catawba Valley Clemson Club.

Before the evening was over, Stuckey had received the key to the city of Hickory, danced to “Tiger Rag” and joined in the Cadence Count. He was presented a football and framed Tiger Rag (both signed by Dabo Swinney), honored by the Catawba Valley Chapter of the Military Officers’ Association of America and serenaded by a local bluegrass band, the SugarLoaf Ramblers.

Kingston Residence, where Stuckey lives, hosted the party, coordinating with the Catawba Valley Clemson Club and his daughter Stephanie Chenault. A number of local alumni attended, including Adam Weeks ’73 (club president) and two members of the Class of 1950, Herman Smith and Theo Monroe. Kay Dodd ’78 led a club committee that helped with the event.

A resident of Hickory since 1962, Stuckey served 20 years in the military, including service in World War II and Korea. He taught high school for 24 years, and moved to Kingston in 2009 where, according to his daughter Stephanie, he loves to watch the Tigers play on TV with fellow alum Alex Corpening ’60, sing, dance, play his harmonica and lead everyone in his version of “Tiger Rag.”

Click on below for more pictures from the celebration.

 

Alumni Association names Jim Bull Volunteer of the Year

Jim Bull (left) receives the Volunteer of the Year award from Wil Brasington, executive director of Alumni Relations.

Jim Bull (left) receives the Volunteer of the Year award from Wil Brasington, executive director of Alumni Relations.

The  Alumni Association has honored Jim Bull of Chapin with the 2015 Frank Kellers III Volunteer of the Year Award, the highest and greatest expression of appreciation extended to an individual by the Alumni Association staff for outstanding service and volunteerism. Bull’s many contributions to the Alumni Association include serving as a multi-year officer for the Lexington County Clemson Club and volunteering with the Columbia Tigertown Bound Reception and the Lexington Prowl & Growl. Bull also is an IPTAY representative and chairs both the student engagement committee and marketing committee for the Board of Visitors. In the past year, he chaired the Columbia high school reception for students applying to Clemson and participated in nearly every student sendoff.

The Alumni Association has presented the Frank Kellers III Volunteer of the Year Award since 1988 to recognize individuals who have a passion for service and building the Clemson family. The award is named for Frank Kellers III ’57, longtime leader of the Northern California Clemson Club and tireless supporter of Clemson clubs around the world.

Clemson at the State House

CUatStathouseClemson alumni and friends turned the State House orange on March 1 for “Clemson at the State House.”

For information about how you can be a member of the Clemson Advocates Program, a grassroots volunteer advocacy group that seeks to engage, inform and encourage alumni and friends to communicate with members of the South Carolina General Assembly and other elected officials regarding issues of importance to Clemson and higher education, go to clemson.edu/alumni and click on “Get Involved.”

View a gallery of photos from the day.

 

Jane Duckworth named Honorary Alumna

Jane Duckworth receives a certificate naming her an honorary alumna from Danny Gregg, president of the Alumni Association board.

Jane Duckworth receives a certificate naming her an honorary alumna from Danny Gregg, president of the Alumni Association board.

Jane Duckworth of Atlanta is the newest Clemson honorary alumna. Her diploma may say Meredith College, but her life says Clemson loud and clear.

A member of the President’s Leadership Circle, she co-chaired the Will to Lead athletics capital campaign committee with her husband, Ed, during the leadership phase; is chair of the tennis capital campaign committee; and supports the Brooks Center for the Performing Arts and scholarships for the College of Business and Behavioral Science. The Duckworths also donated $500,000 to create the Duckworth Pavilion, an enhancement to the Hoke Sloan Tennis Center, and have been inducted into the Thomas Green Clemson Cumulative Giving Society.

After graduating from Meredith College, Duckworth taught elementary school in Clemson while her husband, Ed, completed his degree in civil engineering at Clemson. They have three children, Jeff Duckworth ’88, Leeanne Melvin ’90 and Jim Duckworth.

Honorary alumni are selected by the Alumni Association Honors and Awards Committee for their outstanding service, lifelong devotion and loyalty to the University or the Alumni Association.

New Alumni App Available

iphone app alumni_A new Clemson Alumni app is live and available in iTunes. The app pulls stories from the RSS feeds on official Clemson websites including the Newsstand, Athletics, Clemson World and Tigers on the Move. After downloading, you will be able to customize your app experience based on the content you want to see. In addition, you can update contact information through the app and find upcoming events. The app is not yet available through Google or Android stores. To download, go to the App Store and search for Clemson Echo.