Extension agent Katie Shaw honored for public service

Clemson alumna Kathryn “Katie” Berry ShawAlumna Kathryn “Katie” Berry Shaw received the Alumni Award for Cooperative Extension Distinguished Public Service at the December general faculty meeting. An Extension 4-H agent in Laurens County since 2006, Shaw received the honor in recognition of creating innovative, hands-on educational programs that empower youth to become active members of their communities. In addition to her role as a 4-H youth development agent, Shaw currently serves as assistant of the S.C. 4-H horse program, which has led 4-H students to national equestrian awards the past two years. She is president-elect of the South Carolina Association of 4-H Extension Agents, an organization in which she has held numerous leadership positions, as well as president of the 4-H Agent Association.

An Orangeburg native, Shaw participated in 4-H and was S.C. 4-H Presidential Tray Winner, S.C. Future Farmers of America Equine Proficiency Award Winner and two-time Paso Fino Horse Association National Youth Champion in Equitation and Fino. She received her bachelor’s degree (2009) and master’s degree (2011) in agriculture education. “After growing up in 4-H and it playing a major part in my success, I decided to become a 4-H agent. I wanted to make an impact in the lives of young people just like the 4-H agents I had growing up did in my life,” Shaw said. “Being a 4-H agent means that I am constantly learning from co-workers, volunteers and the 4-H members. It is exciting be a part of something that is always changing and growing.”

Shaw and her husband, Jimmie Lee Shaw ’07, received the S.C. Farm Bureau Achievement Award this year. They also won the S.C. Farm Bureau Young Farmer and Rancher Discussion Meet contest in 2015 and were awarded the South Carolina Farm Bureau Young Farmer and Rancher Excellence in Agriculture Award in 2009. They live in Newberry with their two daughters.

Global wellness: Lauren Whitt, Ph.D. ’06

Lauren Whitt had been awake since 3 a.m. PST taking Google Hangout video calls with her global colleagues in London and Sydney. Wearing jeans, a T-shirt and sporting hair still wet from her morning routine, the easy-going Google wellness manager settled in at the California-based headquarters, ready to chat. This unconventional and interactive environment is nothing out of the ordinary for Whitt.

In fact, she prefers it.

“At Google we have a fun culture, so our campuses feel a lot like college campuses. We encourage people to do their work in comfortable and collaborative spaces,” Whitt said.

Whitt’s position at Google is vital — it’s her responsibility to ensure a happy and healthy work environment for every employee. As the wellness manager, her global team promotes and supports the wellbeing of Googlers worldwide. They even set a Guinness World Record for most money raised in 24 hours with their “Get One, Give One” flu vaccination campaign where every flu shot given on campus was matched with a charitable donation to vaccinate people in developing countries.

“Employees spend so much time in the workplace, so if we can create a culture promoting healthy decisions, then we’re ahead of the game,” she said.

One way they achieve this environment is by using behavioral science principles to prompt Googlers to make healthy snack choices.  Google provides free meals and snacks on campus, supporting the principle that collaboration and creativity often occur around food. It’s rare for a Googler to be more than 150 feet from a micro-kitchen or cafe. Sugary drinks are hidden behind frosted glass or on the lowest shelf, while the water bottles are displayed at eye level; healthy snacks are presented in clear bins while unhealthy snacks are hidden behind opaque bins. “Small daily changes promote a healthy office culture and employee base,” Whitt said.

Whitt’s education, including her Ph.D. in parks, recreation and tourism management from Clemson, led her to ask the question, “How do we help people be their best selves in their daily environments?” Though her research initially focused on academic advising and resiliency skill development for college athletes, she found her experience could be applied to inspiring personal action in the workplace.

Whitt’s holistic wellness approach encourages employees to be continually present to achieve their peak performance. “We encourage Googlers to be in the moment,” said Whitt. “If you’re at work, then be present and focused at work; if it’s at home, then invest yourself in your family and friends.”

— Courtney Meola ’17

Planar, Dell team up with Watt Center as Sustaining Partners

Clemson University professor Saadiqa Kumanyika

Clemson University professor Saadiqa Kumanyika, a lecturer teaching Women in Global Perspective, works with one of the classroom touch screens in the Watt Family Innovation Center that were provided by Planar. (Photo by Ken Scar)

Planar and Dell have become the first two Sustaining Innovation Partners for the Watt Family Innovation Center. Sustaining Innovation Partners provide $1 million or more in support for the Watt Center. Planar, a Leyard company and global leader in display and digital signage technology, supplied the Watt Center with 191 large-format, high-resolution interactive LCD displays and 12 LCD video walls, including the video wall in the auditorium. It is one of the largest interactive LCD video walls the company has implemented.

Planar displays are front and center in the building’s ultra-modern main lobby. Each classroom, hallway and study space throughout the building features Planar LCD displays that can be used by students and teachers for formal or spontaneous collaboration.

Dell, a global computing company, is supporting the Watt Center through a five-year technology grant that will help students, faculty and staff use cutting-edge technology to create and collaborate in the center. Dell will provide deeply discounted equipment software and services to empower innovation and collaboration by students, faculty and staff.

The Watt Center was designed to be an innovative hub where students, faculty and industry partners will collaborate, create, innovate and communicate using state-of-the-art technology and interactive learning systems. Both gifts were part of the Will to Lead for Clemson campaign, launched in 2006 in support of students, faculty, facilities and engaged learning. The campaign surpassed the goal of $1 billion in July.

Lighting the way for future engineers

Jennifer Hibberts

Jennifer Hibberts

Jennifer Hibberts traveled an especially unique path to Clemson, one that spanned nearly 7,000 miles, three generations, and the Eastern and Western Hemispheres. Hibberts grew up on a small Army garrison in the Marshall Islands, located in the Pacific Ocean between Hawaii and the Philippines. About 1,000 people live on the island of Kwajalein, and Hibberts’s high school graduating class had only 18 students.

The laid-back island lifestyle in this tightknit community was all Hibberts had ever known until she enrolled at Clemson in 2014. “I was used to an endless summer, and always being able to relax on a beach in the afternoon or go surfing on the weekends. I had to adapt to the ‘brutal’ winters of the Upstate, and football now fills much of my free time on weekends,” said Hibberts.

Despite growing up thousands of miles away, Hibberts’ family has close ties to Clemson and the Southeast, as her parents are legal residents of South Carolina, and she’s now the eighth woman in her family to attend Clemson. “I’m proud to come from such a successful group of women, and grateful for the opportunity to receive the same quality education that propelled them into the careers they are thriving in,” Hibberts said.

Following in her family’s footsteps, Hibberts quickly forged her own path at Clemson in the biosystems engineering program, Calhoun Honors College, extracurricular activities like the debate team and club water polo team, and her community of friends. Hibberts is also a Grand Challenges Scholar at Clemson. The program, sponsored by the National Academy of Engineers, seeks to equip college students to become well-rounded engineers ready to tackle the world’s largest challenges.

Through the program, Hibberts has been provided opportunities to study abroad in the French Riviera, gain hands-on research experience and network with industry leaders. In spring 2016, Hibberts added another honor when she became one of five inaugural recipients of the Hubbell Lighting Annual Engineering Scholarship, established by Hubbell Lighting to provide scholarships to exceptional engineering students. Hubbell Lighting and the Hubbell Foundation also established the Hubbell Foundation Scholarship Endowment, which will fund scholarships for years to come.

As the recipient of multiple scholarships at Clemson, Hibberts understands the importance of giving back. When she graduates from Clemson in 2018, she plans to apply to the Peace Corps. Hibberts’ experiences growing up in the Marshall Islands and at Clemson have instilled in her a passion for service and a global perspective. “I have been blessed to be able to travel and live in so many places around the world, and it has sparked a deep wanderlust within me,” says Hibberts. “I’d love to continue to live and work overseas.” The gift from Hubbell Lighting and the Hubbell Foundation was part of the successful $1 billion Will to Lead for Clemson campaign.

Siemens provides Clemson with largest ever in-kind technology grant

 

At the announcement of the Siemens gift, a “thought leadership” panel discussion
was moderated by Ted Pitts, president and CEO of the S.C. Chamber of Commerce.
U.S. undersecretary of education Ted Mitchell, automotive engineering graduate student Shweta Rawat, associate professor of mechanical engineering Greg Mocko and adjunct professor of automotive engineering Joerg Schulte discussed the Siemens software and the role of technology in education and Upstate South Carolina’s role in the automotive sector.

Clemson has received the largest grant-in-kind in its history from Siemens, a global technology company. Software valued at more than $357 million will be incorporated into coursework and projects related to computer-aided design, engineering simulation, industrial design, digital manufacturing and manufacturing management in the College of Engineering, Computing and Applied Sciences.

Both undergraduate and graduate students will have access to a product lifecycle management (PLM) software used by more than 140,000 companies throughout the global manufacturing industry — including 35 in South Carolina — to design, develop and manufacture some of the world’s most sophisticated products in a variety of industries.

This academic partnership will help students compete for jobs throughout the world and aid in building a workforce equipped with the skills needed for the high-tech jobs of tomorrow. “Preparing students to be highly competitive in the 21st century global economy is a central part of Clemson’s mission, and this new partnership with Siemens will provide our students with access to cutting-edge technical tools that can make them even more attractive to future employers — especially many of the world-class, advanced manufacturing companies operating in South Carolina,” said Clemson President Jim Clements. Kevin Yates, a 1989 Clemson alumnus and head of Siemens energy management division, said, “I am proud that Siemens is providing students with access to this software, positioning the University at the forefront of innovation and technology.

This partnership is rooted in a shared commitment to innovation and collaboration, and will allow Clemson — and South Carolina — to build a pipeline of skilled talent for the state’s growing manufacturing industry.” Clemson’s dedication to technology and innovation makes the University an ideal recipient for the in-kind software grant. With the University’s vision to create a high-tech collaborative environment through the Watt Family Innovation Center, Clemson shares Siemens’ commitment to fostering innovation, advancing technology and developing the next-generation workforce. To learn more about students using Siemens software, go to clemson.world and click on “Clemson Forever.”

Peru: Walton Norris ’02

My wife and I recently visited Peru, and like many visitors to that beautiful country, we journeyed into the mountains to make our pilgrimage to the famous Incan ruins of Machu Picchu. While in the city of Cusco, known as the gateway to Machu Picchu, we visited a local watering hole called “Norton Rat’s Tavern” located on the main town square.

The walls and ceiling of the pub were covered with various flags from around the world, including some that represented a variety of sports teams. I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to donate my Tiger Rag, and they welcomed the addition.

Why was it important to me to leave this small token of the University that I love so dearly in a city that sits over 11,000 feet above sea level? “…that the Tiger’s roar may echo o’er the mountain heights.”

Go Tigers!

My Clemson: Joey Wilson ’17 Duncan, South Carolina

My time at Clemson has been quite a ride. I watched the Tigers win their first football national championship in 35 years. I’ve devoted my senior year to serving as undergraduate student body president. I met former Vice President Joe Biden while working in the fight against sexual assault. I’ve traveled the world from the Balkans to China.

The thing that probably drives me the most is my desire to have an impact on the world and change Clemson for the better. Every morning when I wake up, I take some time and think about different things I could do to make someone’s day a little bit better.

Relationships are so important. I think in our generation one of the things that’s lost right now is personal interaction. Some technology is great, but I think it’s important to meet face-to-face with someone and have a real conversation. That’s how you solve a lot of problems.

In my travels, I’ve learned that everyone is more similar than they are different. Everyone wants to be loved. Everyone wants to find happiness. Even if you don’t speak the same language, just a smile and handshake goes a long way. It’s not always about where you go. It’s about who you meet and who you’re sharing it with.

The honors I’ve received while at Clemson University have been humbling. It’s been wonderful to have been named a Schwarzman Scholar and to have received the Astronaut Foundation scholarship. I wouldn’t be here without the support of my family, the Governor’s School for Science and Mathematics, the Department of Bioengineering at Clemson, my research mentor Dr. Delphine Dean, all my professors and the Calhoun Honors College.

I’ll miss Clemson after graduation. But I’m excited about the next chapter in my life, and I will always be a Tiger.

Joey is graduating this month with a degree in bioengineering and a minor in global politics and will be pursuing a master’s in public policy at Tsinghua University in Beijing, China, as a Schwarzman Scholar this fall. In 2018, he will move to England to pursue a Ph.D. in oncology as a Cambridge International Scholar at Cambridge University.

Travelers Spring 2017

Cole Swartwood ‘16 and Sammie Flynn ‘17: After traveling to see Clemson shut out Ohio State in the Fiesta Bowl on New Year’s Eve we decided to travel north to Page, Arizona. Page is home to one of the most popular sites to see nature has to offer, the Horseshoe Bend. We took our Tiger Rag within a few feet of the edge to get this awesome picture.

Whether you were in Tampa or elsewhere, we heard you celebrating the Clemson championship for weeks! Below are fan photos submitted to us.

Have your own photo you want to share? Email jdselle@clemson.edu and we’ll add it to the gallery.