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Researchers explore economical, environmentally friendly technology

Professors Chris Cole (left) and Philip Brown.

Professors Chris Cole (left) and Philip Brown.

With key support from the Walmart Foundation and its U.S. Manufacturing Innovation Fund, Clemson textile experts are working with the world’s most widely used fiber, polyester, to develop technologies that will make dyeing it more economical and environmentally friendly.

Chris Cole, a faculty member in materials science and engineering, has extensive experience in both textile and apparel design and fabrication, while her collaborator, Philip Brown, also a faculty member in materials science and engineering, is recognized nationally and internationally for his work in designing and extruding textile fibers.

The nearly $1 million award from the Walmart Foundation allows the research team to pursue three primary research objectives: reduce the amount of dyestuff required to color polyester; reduce the energy required to color polyester; and lower the amount of colored effluent from polyester dyeing processes. Effluent is the liquid waste remaining from the dyeing process, and as Cole has noted, “There’s a lot of dye used in dyeing polyester to be able to get the colors that we all know and love like our bright Clemson orange.”

The award was announced by the Walmart Foundation and the U.S. Conference of Mayors at the 2016 meeting of the U.S. Conference of Mayors in Washington, D.C. Clemson is one of five universities conducting research through this opportunity, which is focused on supporting research that strives to create new manufacturing technologies and to reduce the cost of producing goods in the U.S. with the ultimate goal of creating jobs that support America’s growing manufacturing base. Clemson’s award is supporting 2½ years of research.

Within Clemson’s Olin Hall is a unique machine that has enabled the research team to design a polyester fiber that will dye more easily. “The funding provided by the Walmart Foundation has allowed me to build this machine — something that has never been done before — and it’s phenomenal,” said Brown. “There’s only one in the world.” Researchers in the industry have attempted to dye polyester using copolymers, but due to fiber manufacturing technology limitations, they typically used a single polymer. This technology also suffered a very poor wash fastness unlike the technology Brown and his researchers have developed. “We might dye a fabric a brilliant orange, but after it was laundered a few times you could see the color was starting to fade with these other polymers,” said Cole. “Because of Dr. Brown’s expertise and the facilities we have at Clemson, we can now build fibers where we can take advantage of being able to get the dye in quickly with intense colors and excellent dye pickup by the fibers. We’re not leaving as much dye behind at the end of the cycle, but at the same time we’re going to be able to get the wash fastness and the light fastness that the commercial market requires.”

Materials science and engineering makes it a priority to get students involved in projects that provide them with hands-on research experience. “By being part of a major research project, students can see the techniques that we use, how to design a large project, how to build a team effectively for a large project and the communication skills you have to have,” said Cole. Another benefit is that students are introduced to the manufacturers who are their potential employers. With another award from the U.S. Manufacturing Innovation Fund announced this year, these two researchers are optimistic about expanding their research program to look at how they might develop polyester fibers that achieve a high level of water and oil repellency at lower economic and environmental cost.

McCall endows Clemson agriculture college scholarship

Peter LeRoy “Roy” McCall Jr. ’53Continuing in the footsteps of Clemson founder Thomas Green Clemson, who established the University with a legacy of land, Peter LeRoy “Roy” McCall Jr. ’53 has established a new scholarship endowment through a gift of land valued at more than $1 million. The Peter LeRoy “Roy” McCall Jr. ’53 Scholarship Endowment will fund scholarships for students in the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences like Carlos Morales Jr., a freshman agricultural mechanization and business major. “This gift will make a huge difference for students,” said Morales. “The scholarships I received have allowed me the opportunity to attend Clemson, and my decision to attend Clemson was supported by generous donors like Mr. McCall.” “I am proud to know that this gift is an asset to Clemson and to the fellow students who will take advantage of this scholarship program.

I wish the students well,” McCall said when the gift was announced at the South Carolina
Farm Bureau CAFLS Alumni Tailgate in November. “Mr. McCall’s gift will benefit Clemson’s College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences literally forever. It is a demonstration of faith in the future and of faith in Clemson,” said President James P. Clements. McCall earned his bachelor’s degree in agronomy from Clemson in 1953 and has been a long-time supporter of his alma mater. In 2009, he established an endowment to provide Universitywide scholarships that have helped more than 75 students attend Clemson.

He has also supported Clemson’s Scroll of Honor and Military Heritage Plaza, the WestZone project in Memorial Stadium and the Class of 1953 Golden Anniversary Scholarship Endowment. In addition, McCall supports the Clemson University President’s Fund. “Mr. McCall’s gift of a scholarship endowment to the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences will open doors for deserving students to attend CAFLS and will have a direct, positive impact on our ability to educate the next generation of agribusiness leaders,” said George Askew, dean of the college and vice president of Public Service and Agriculture.

Planar, Dell team up with Watt Center as Sustaining Partners

Clemson University professor Saadiqa Kumanyika

Clemson University professor Saadiqa Kumanyika, a lecturer teaching Women in Global Perspective, works with one of the classroom touch screens in the Watt Family Innovation Center that were provided by Planar. (Photo by Ken Scar)

Planar and Dell have become the first two Sustaining Innovation Partners for the Watt Family Innovation Center. Sustaining Innovation Partners provide $1 million or more in support for the Watt Center. Planar, a Leyard company and global leader in display and digital signage technology, supplied the Watt Center with 191 large-format, high-resolution interactive LCD displays and 12 LCD video walls, including the video wall in the auditorium. It is one of the largest interactive LCD video walls the company has implemented.

Planar displays are front and center in the building’s ultra-modern main lobby. Each classroom, hallway and study space throughout the building features Planar LCD displays that can be used by students and teachers for formal or spontaneous collaboration.

Dell, a global computing company, is supporting the Watt Center through a five-year technology grant that will help students, faculty and staff use cutting-edge technology to create and collaborate in the center. Dell will provide deeply discounted equipment software and services to empower innovation and collaboration by students, faculty and staff.

The Watt Center was designed to be an innovative hub where students, faculty and industry partners will collaborate, create, innovate and communicate using state-of-the-art technology and interactive learning systems. Both gifts were part of the Will to Lead for Clemson campaign, launched in 2006 in support of students, faculty, facilities and engaged learning. The campaign surpassed the goal of $1 billion in July.

Snow family to match up to $1 million to complete student recreation center

They may not have graduated from Clemson, but you wouldn’t know it from the orange in their wardrobe and the generosity they exhibit. David and Lynette Snow of Darien, Connecticut, who donated $2.4 million toward the intramural field complex on Hartwell Lake, have pledged an additional $1 million in matching funds to complete the project.

The Snows, whose daughter Ashley graduated from Clemson in 2015, became the most generous non-alumni Clemson parents in University history with their original gift. This fundraising challenge money will go toward adding new playing fields, facilities and educational areas to the recreation center.

“Lynette, our whole family and I continue to see how a world-class outdoor wellness and fitness center at Clemson will transform not only intramural activity on campus but have a daily impact on the lives of Clemson students and the surrounding community,” said David Snow. “We hope our gift doesn’t just raise awareness of this campaign, but inspires everyone to support Clemson. No gift is too small when we are working to enhance and transform the lives of Clemson students.”

In addition to the intramural fields, the center allows students to enjoy water and beach activities, and several student club sports are located there. It also offers the Clemson community amenities to enjoy year-round.

Join the Snow Family Challenge.

ClemsonLIFE professorship established

Sue Brugnolie Stanzione was a first-generation American who emigrated to the U.S. from Italy. She moved to Hartsville in 1959 with her family. Only a few years later her husband died, leaving her the single parent of five children, two of whom, Bob and Dan, were students at Clemson.

Dan’s roommate at Clemson, Goz Segars, also from Hartsville, remembers how much respect everyone had for Sue and for how she held the family together in difficult times. Almost 50 years later, Sue Stanzione’s name now graces the Distinguished Professorship of ClemsonLIFE, held by its founder and executive director, Joe Ryan. That professorship, made possible thanks to a generous gift by Bob and Kaye Stanzione, will make a difference in the lives of countless generations of ClemsonLIFE students.

ClemsonLIFE (Learning is for Everyone) allows students with special needs the opportunity to attend Clemson and receive the full college experience while learning the skills to lead independent lives. As President Clements said, “What ClemsonLIFE does for its students is simply remarkable, and it is the embodiment of the very best nature of the Clemson family.”

Bob and Kaye Stanzione began their married life in campus housing, and all three of their children attended Clemson. A 1969 graduate, Bob is executive chair of ARRIS Group, a global communications technology leader. Kaye is an active volunteer and serves on the ClemsonLIFE advisory board.

 

 

 

 

 

Leaving Their Mark: Poes’ blood runs orange

The Poes are one of the many spirited families that make up the sea of orange and purple at Clemson’s Death Valley during football season. Tailgating outside of the stadium and clapping along to the beat of “Tiger Rag” are traditions David and Jade have been participating in since they were students. But when the chips and dip are gone and the Cadence Count has ended, the couple’s alma mater is not forgotten. The Poes’ blood runs orange, and they take pride in supporting Clemson in numerous ways.

A 1994 graduate, David Poe found the University’s environment to be the perfect place for him to grow both intellectually and socially. He formed lifelong relationships through his involvement in many campus organizations including Greek life and Student Alumni Council.

For Jade Poe, a 2004 alumna, college was less of a certainty. “I was raised by a single mother, so I didn’t know if I would be able to afford college. Thanks to Clemson’s generous alumni, I received a scholarship and was the first in my family to graduate from college,” she said. “Clemson was more than the friendships I made and the football games. It was an opportunity I didn’t think I would have.”

It is important to the Poes that they do their part to provide future Tigers the same memorable experience they had as students. Not only does the couple support the Clemson Forever Fund annually, they have also included the University in their will. “Clemson was founded based on a gift from Thomas Green Clemson. I think it is neat that we can contribute to Clemson using the same method, and it is a great way to make Clemson part of our legacy,” said David Poe.

“I was able to attend Clemson because of the scholarships I received, and donating allows me to give that same opportunity to students who were in my position. Knowing that my donation can help students continue their education so they can have a successful career is very rewarding,” said Jade.

 

Yountses commit Cornerstone Gift for athletics facilities

Melvin K. and Dollie Younts, donors to the sixth Cornerstone Gift to athletics. 

Melvin K. and Dollie Younts, passionate Clemson fans and philanthropists from Fountain Inn, pledged the sixth Cornerstone Gift to athletics. The recently renovated 600-seat South Club area at Memorial Stadium has been named the Melvin and Dollie Younts South Club in appreciation of their $2.5 million commitment, announced in August.

“Melvin and Dollie have been tremendous supporters of various institutions and initiatives throughout the Upstate,” said President Clements. “We’re thankful for their support of our athletics programs and the impact their gift will have on student-athletes and Clemson fans for generations to come.”

The Clemson Athletic Cornerstone Program is a vital part of the new athletics facilities initiative. With new facilities, upgrades and rebuilds planned for or underway at football, basketball, baseball, tennis, soccer and academic support, it is the most comprehensive change to the facilities of athletics ever undertaken at Clemson.

Melvin Younts, a retired attorney with the firm of Younts, Alford, Brown and Goodson, is trustee and chief executive officer of Palmetto Real Estate Trust. The Yountses are noted philanthropists in the Upstate, having contributed significantly to various community organizations.

Swinneys pledge $1 million to IPTAY

Dabo and Kathleen Swinney pledged $1 million to IPTAY last fall in support of Clemson football to provide future funding for programmatic and building initiatives that will continue to propel the program forward.

“Kathleen and I are blessed,” said Swinney. “And we have always known we need to use those blessings to do good for others. It’s so important to us that we give back to this program that has been so good to us.”

While Kathleen and Dabo Swinney have a long history of generosity, they would never call their missions accomplished. Dabo sounds like the passionate coach he is when he talks about getting behind these Clemson programs: “You know, Clemson is a great school. But we can’t rest on that. We’ve got so much more to do. We have to always strive to get better, and that’s why we’ve got a new strategic plan at the University called ClemsonForward. That says it all. Just like playing offense in football: It’s all about the forward progress. No progress. No win. We can’t stop now.”

Business school receives press valued at nearly $1 million

Printing press giant, Nilpeter has completely outfitted a FB-3 13-inch fully automated servo press at Clemson University Graphics Communication Center in Godfrey Hall. Professor Kern Cox and students observed its operation.

Clemson’s nationally recognized graphic communications program just got better, thanks to a nearly $1 million gift-in-kind from global press supplier Nilpeter Inc. The state-of-the-art flexographic printing press will enable the University to build on its reputation as one of the nation’s leaders in printing and packaging design education by providing students with this cutting-edge teaching tool.

“Nilpeter’s gift is an investment in the next generation of packaging design leaders,” said President Clements. “We appreciate, and are honored, that Nilpeter recognizes Clemson as a leader in preparing high-caliber printing and packaging design professionals for the industry.” Clemson’s graphic communications program has long been recognized as a national leader in packaging design and printing education with a hands-on approach that gives students an employability advantage. The program boasts a 95 percent employment rate upon graduation.

“Our students understand marketplace competitiveness and how implementing technology can keep companies strong and innovative,” said Charles “Chip” Tonkin, department chair. “The value of this gift extends to potential employers in that they want students who know how to utilize and implement the latest technologies to stay competitive. We appreciate that Nilpeter believes in our students and faculty to invest this level of commitment in Clemson and the industry.”

A global printing company with nearly 100 years of engineering expertise in printing, Nilpeter serves businesses in 65 countries with high-quality label and narrow-web printing solutions. “Nilpeter is strongly committed to the education of the next generation of printers. By operating the latest and most innovative technology, we aim to inspire skilled students to positively influence the printing industry in the years to come,” said Lars Eriksen, CEO and owner of Nilpeter.

Inaugural Give Day exceeds expectations

Give Day donations will support student, faculty and facility needs.

Give Day donations will support student, faculty and facility needs.

This spring, the Clemson family showed its generosity, with more than 3,000 donors giving more than $900,000 to support student, faculty, staff and facility needs during the inaugural Give Day event on April 6, also Clemson Founder’s Day.

“We asked the Clemson family and friends to help support the University on Give Day, and they did that and more,” said Brian O’Rourke, vice president for Development and Alumni Relations. “Their generosity exceeded our expectations. We thank them on behalf of our present and future students who are the ultimate beneficiaries of these gifts.”

The gifts from alumni, students, faculty, staff and supporters — totaling $903,883.76 — helped the University exceed this year’s $105 million private fundraising goal, with a record-breaking $149 million in support of the Will to Lead capital campaign.

Among Give Day donors was a couple who pledged $250,000 and Hubbell Lighting Inc., a corporate leader, with its $10,000 gift that will provide five $2,000 scholarships. More than half of the gifts were made online. There were 1,608 posts on social media — mostly Twitter — about Give Day.
To the donors, O’Rourke said, “Thank you for helping us get one step closer to the end zone of our Will to Lead capital campaign. Your gifts will leave a lasting impact.”
You can find more information about Give Day at clemson.edu/giveday/.