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TWO NAMED HONORARY ALUMNI

Each fall, the alumni association considers bestowing the title of honorary  alumnus on individuals who have been nominated because of their service, loyalty and devotion to Clemson and/or the Alumni Association. This year, the Alumni Association honored JoVanna King and Frank Inabnit III. While neither has crossed the stage to receive a Clemson diploma, their lives and actions demonstrate that their blood runs orange.

King is senior director of estate planning and principal gifts at Clemson. For more than 25 years she has raised money to support the University. She has worked on all three of Clemson’s capital campaigns including the recently completed Will to Lead campaign, which raised more than $1 billion. According to Vice President for Development and Alumni Relations Brian O’Rourke, King has been involved in raising more philanthropic dollars than any other employee of the University. According to President Emeritus Jim Barker, the dollars don’t tell the whole story. “The dollars are impressive,” he wrote in his nomination letter, “but it is the lives of Clemson students and faculty that motivate her.”

Inabnit, a resident of Jacksonville, Florida, is retired after a career in electrical drafting and programming. The son of a 1941 alumnus, he was born deaf andwas unable to attend Clemson. “He has spent his entire life in a silent world,” wrote his sister, Catherine Inabnit, in her nomination. “He has never heard the word ‘Clemson.’ He’s never heard the ‘Tiger Rag’ or the Clemson Alma Mater, but Clemson has been a very important part of his life and occupies a large and special place in his heart.”

A loyal IPTAY member for 45 years, Inabnit has served as an IPTAY representative and has contributed to the Alumni Association for more than 25 years.

Nominations for honorary alumnus will open in the fall; for more information, go to clemson.edu/alumni and click on “Awards and Honors.”

Former President Max Lennon, 1940 – 2016

Archie Max Lennon, the 11th president of Clemson University, died on November 29, 2016.

A native North Carolinian, Lennon was born in Columbus County on September 27, 1940, to Denver H. and Mary Kelly Lennon. He attended Mars Hills College, graduating with an associate degree in agriculture, before going on to earn a bachelor of science at North Carolina State, where he returned to complete a Ph.D. in 1970.

Positions in academia included Texas Tech, University of Missouri-Columbia and Ohio State before he accepted the presidency of Clemson in 1986.

Lennon led the University’s first multimillion dollar capital campaign, which was responsible for raising more than $101 million. During his presidency, Clemson experienced unprecedented growth and success in research and private fundraising. The University’s research expenditures quadrupled and academic fundraising more than tripled.

President Lennon also advanced the concept of strategic planning at the University, which led to the identification of Universitywide priorities and goals, and a process for restructuring the University for the 21st century. His impact on campus can still be seen in projects and infrastructure such as the Brooks Center, Sullivan Wellness Center, Hunter Laboratory, Garrison Arena and the Fluor Daniel Building. His influence also exists in programs such as Communication Across the Curriculum and the University’s partnership with the Greenville Hospital System, as well as in the establishment of degree programs such as packaging science and landscape architecture.

After resigning in 1994, Lennon worked briefly with Eastern Foods, then accepted the presidency of Mars Hill College in 1995, where he served until 2002, when he resigned and became president of the Education and Research Consortium of the Western Carolinas.

He is survived by his wife Ruth and two children, Daniel R. Lennon ’91 and Robin Lennon Bylenga M ’91, and grandchildren.

*Clemson will host a Celebration of Life service at 2 p.m. Dec. 13 at the President’s Box in Memorial Stadium on the main campus.

President Clements receives honorary degree from alma mater

InTheseHills_Clements UMBC GradPresident Clements may be a three-time alumnus of University of Maryland – Baltimore County (UMBC), but he can now add a fourth degree to his resume. In May, he and Harvard University President Drew Gilpin Faust received honorary degrees from the institution during the spring commencement ceremonies. He is pictured here with UMBC president Freeman Hrabowski III.

UMBC is a member of the University of Maryland system and is a public research university with an enrollment of approximately 14,000 graduate and undergraduate students. Clements, who earned a bachelor’s degree in computer science in 1985 and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in operations analysis in 1991 and 1993, respectively, received an honorary doctorate of education and spoke at the graduate school commencement ceremony. Faust spoke at the undergraduate commencement ceremony and received an honorary doctorate of public service.

“I’m so pleased and honored to return to my alma mater to address the graduate students of the university that has significant personal meaning in my life.” Clements said. “I stood in their place not so very long ago, and I’m anxious to see how they will make a difference with the education they have received. UMBC is one of the most innovative universities in the country and highly regarded. A degree from this prestigious university will help open many doors for these new graduates.”