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New Clemson Club in the Twin Cities

We are excited to announce that Clemson has arrived in the Twin Cities. The Twin Cities Clemson Club supports not only the Twin Cities areas of Minneapolis and St. Paul, but also welcomes alumni, friends, family and fans from the surrounding areas of greater Minnesota, Iowa, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin.

The Twin Cities Clemson Club started colonizing in late 2014 under the leadership of Tyler Morey ’10. The club held its first unofficial gathering for the Russell Athletic Bowl vs. Oklahoma at Freehouse in Minneapolis. The turnout was great for a cold and snowy Monday evening with 23 alumni, family and friends coming to cheer Tiger nation to victory.  After the first event, Morey quickly drafted help from local alumni Kristen Hodgkins Braun ’02 and Paul Wisnewski ’85, M ’87. The club drew even bigger crowds in 2015 for the ACC Football Championship, the ACC/Big Ten Challenge against the University of Minnesota Golden Gophers men’s basketball team, and the National Championship game in January 2016. They also added more members to their leadership team — Heather Lankford
Huck ’99 and Natalie Patzin ’13, M ’14.

Members of the club are thrilled that the Minnesota Vikings drafted two of our young stars, Mackensie Alexander and Jayron Kearse, this spring. The club is planning a caravan to the Vikings Training Camp this summer to welcome Mack and Jayron to Minnesota as their first official event. The caravan is tentatively scheduled for the first Saturday
in August. Find the club on social media: Twitter at @TC_ClemsonClub and Instagram at @twincitiesclemsonclub.

For more information, email the club at twincitiesclub@alumni.clemson.edu.

 

 

Alumni gather in Japan

Japan Clemson1A group of alumni, former faculty, exchange students and current students are beginning the process to form a Clemson Club in Japan. They recently gathered in Tokyo with a group of about 12, including former faculty members Toshiko and Yuji Kishimoto, at an izakaya (a Japanese gastropub) for drinks and food and then went to an Italian bar. They closed out the evening with another mixture of cultures: a traditional Japanese-style event closing punctuated with the cadence count.

 

Alumni survey: You spoke, and we listened.

Alumni pie charts numbersEvery three to four years, we survey alumni to gauge how we’re doing as an alumni association. We look to see how you feel about the University — about choosing to attend, your experience as a student and as an alumnus — and what impacts your current opinion of Clemson. We also want to discover what you need from us and how we can better serve you.

We use this information as we plan for the future, as we decide which programs need to change and how can better serve you, the alumni of Clemson.

This year, we sent out more than 65,000 surveys, and 3,782 of you responded. Here is just a snapshot of the survey results.

SATISFACTION INDEX: 91%

The “Satisfaction Index” is calculated by averaging responses to these four questions, with the result being expressed as a percentage.

• How would you rate your decision to attend Clemson?
• How often do you promote Clemson to others?
• Which of the following best describes your experiences as an alumnus/a?
• Which of the following best describes your overall current opinion of Clemson?

While the national average is 80 percent, Clemson’s number has moved up from 89 percent in 2012.

When asked what impacts their overall current opinion of the University, alumni ranked these items highest:

• Value and respect for degree
• History/tradition
• Accomplishments of students
• Providing scholarships
• Campus aesthetics (e.g., buildings, grounds, etc.)

Modes of communication

Alumni rated email, Clemson World magazine and the Echo (electronic newsletter) as the three most important communication methods. Younger alumni feel that we’re not using email as effectively as possible. We also need to improve in the areas of invitations to University and alumni activities, and to communicate more effectively about services and benefits of being an alumnus.

The importance of alumni involvement

When asked, “How important is it for you and alumni in general to do the following and how well does Clemson do at supporting alumni in doing them?” alumni ranked four areas of alumni involvement as “very important.” The top two were serving as ambassadors by promoting Clemson to others and identifying job opportunities for graduates. In both of those areas, we need to provide more support for alumni. Third ranked was recruiting students, and fourth was providing financial support for Clemson (e.g., donations). Alumni feel Clemson supports them well in those roles.

Alumni Services needs

Alumni rated the following services as most needed:

• Networking
• Career search strategies
• Career planning, mapping and goal setting

Not surprisingly, all three were ranked higher by younger alumni.

We’re moving forward.

Thank you for letting us know what you think. We have already begun planning in the areas you’ve told us need improvement, and we’ll communicate with you about the process and ask for feedback.

 

McMillan named Alumni Master Teacher

Kerri-McMillan-with-students

Students chose Kerri D. McMillan as the 2016 Alumni Master Teacher. McMillan is a senior lecturer in the finance department of the College of Business and teaches courses in investment analysis, risk management, insurance and personal finance to 150 upper-level undergraduates each semester. The award for outstanding undergraduate classroom instruction is presented each spring to a faculty member nominated by the student body and selected by the Student Alumni Council.

“I am so honored to be the recipient of this award. I was still so excited Monday night, I could hardly sleep,” said McMillan. “I especially enjoyed hearing what my students had to say about me. I truly love my field of finance and teaching our Clemson students. When I pull into Sirrine Hall parking lot, I count my blessings. I love every day I am in the classroom.”

Alumni Master Teacher Award co-chair Parkwood Griffith said McMillan’s penchant for instilling passion in her students where it might not have been before and showing them the real-world applications for what they learn in her class helped set her nomination apart. “Students felt like she encouraged and prepared them about finance in the real world,” said Griffith.

McMillan received a bachelor’s degree in marketing from Southeastern Louisiana University and an MBA from the University of South Carolina. Before coming to Clemson, she spent a decade as a portfolio manager and securities analyst for an investment management company in Greenville.

Put a Ring on it

Morgann Alcumbrack, Fleming Hall and Mary Catherine Harbin were three of the more than 1,700 students who purchased their Clemson rings this past fall. The three-day fall ring sale set a record for the most rings ever purchased in a semester.

For more information about how you can purchase a Clemson ring, or other related merchandise, go to alumni.clemson.edu.

Bradley named honorary alumna

Lifelong-Mary-BradleyReferring to her as “one of the University’s most enthusiastic and dedicated champions,” the Alumni Association has named Mary Dalby Bradley an honorary alumna for her lifelong devotion and demonstrated loyalty.

“Mary Bradley has earned her way into the Clemson Family with a smile on her face each step of the way,” said President Emeritus James F. Barker in his nomination. “After they were married, she and Phil moved into married student housing in our prefabs. This began a lifelong love affair for Mary with all things Clemson.”

The Bradleys have become well known for hosting meetings of Clemson in the Lowcountry — a group that keeps alumni in the Charleston area in touch with one another and with the University — at their home on Johns Island, where they have built a “tavern” next to the main house that is decked out from top to bottom in Clemson paraphernalia.

Barker noted that Bradley also has been joyful in her financial support of Clemson, making a gift with her husband that supports more than 4,000 students each year through the Creative Inquiry undergraduate research program.

To see a list of past honorary alumni or to view award guidelines, visit alumni.clemson.edu and click on “Awards.”

Class of ’65 celebrates Clemson ties, generosity

LifeLong-Class65collageFifty years after they walked the stage to receive their diplomas, nearly 100 alumni from the Class of 1965 presented the school a check for $1,227,872 to help future students do the same.

The group gathered near the Class of 1965 sidewalk — a shady path that cuts under the lush oak trees of Fort Hill — to celebrate their Golden Tiger Reunion and present the check to President James P. Clements.

Clements praised the group for their initiative and dedication.

“We cannot thank you enough for establishing this scholarship fund to help students have the same great Clemson experience that you all had,”
he said. “I am so grateful for your forward thinking that will help students for generations to come.”

The Class of 1965 Scholarship Endowment was established in 1989. It made the class one of the first to establish a scholarship in conjunction with its 25th reunion. The class members’ goal was to get the endowment to at least $25,000 by their 25th reunion, and they far exceeded that goal with $43,000 by the time they gathered to celebrate.

The endowment has been growing and regularly providing support for Clemson students ever since.

Lifelong-Kaci-Bennettclass65Rising senior Kaci Bennett, a recipient of Class of 1965 scholarships three years in a row, took the podium to thank them for their generosity.

“I am so excited and incredibly honored to be able to thank each and every one of you for this generous gift,” she said. “As an out-of-state student, part of the reason I chose to go to Clemson was because of the feeling of the Clemson Family. Seeing all of you here today shows me how strong the Clemson Family is.”

“When we started planning our 50th reunion, we decided to put our focus on building our scholarship endowment to a truly significant level,” said Gary Faulkenberry of the 50th reunion planning committee. “We reflected on the many years and the many ways that we have benefited from the education that we received at Clemson. Clemson did not just teach us how to make a living, it also prepared us to make a life. In gratitude for that, we decided that we would use this opportunity — our golden anniversary — to make a lasting impression of our own for future Clemson students.”

Their endowment will do just that, said Clements.

“At the end of this ceremony, you will take a walk down your senior class sidewalk where you will see your names etched into the pavement,” he said. “But, because of your scholarship endowment, the legacy you are leaving behind is much bigger than that. Your legacy is represented by each of the students who benefit from your generosity.”

The contribution to the endowment is part of the Will to Lead for Clemson capital campaign to raise $1 billion to support Clemson students and faculty with scholarships, professorships, facilities, technology and enhanced opportunities for learning and research. Including the endowment, the class has given a total of $15,122,050 to Clemson initiatives.

While the Class of ’65 was celebrating their 50th, alumni from classes ranging from 1939 to 1967 made it the largest reunion in 10 years.

Lifelong-GoldenTiger

Christening the Patrick Anderson

Lifelong-PatrickAndersonBoatThis spring, a new crew boat hit the water at Clemson, thanks to the generosity of the family and friends of the late Patrick Anderson ’07. Anderson, who passed away last summer, was a member of the rowing club, and family and friends contributed funds in his memory to purchase a new crew boat. The boat was christened the Patrick Anderson before it was used in a race against the University of Georgia.

Crew team member Patrick Essex described the race: “We had a spectacular final race in the Patrick Anderson. We came back from nearly half of a boat-length behind in the last 250 meters of the race to beat UGA by 0.4 seconds, finishing with what I think might be a Clemson sprints record of 6:24.4. It was one of the greatest races I have ever been a part of, and it was obvious that there was something beyond the guys in that boat pushing us forward.”

A ceramics and materials engineering major at Clemson, Anderson was employed by Corning in Wilmington, N.C., as the submarine fiber-products supervisor. He maintained an active lifestyle including running marathons, cross-country biking, triathlons and was an Ironman.