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Richardsons support Emerging Leaders

Clemson Trustee Mark Richardson and his wife, Kathryn, present a check at the Spring Game representing their $1 million gift in support of Emerging Scholars students.

Clemson Trustee Mark Richardson and his wife, Kathryn, present a check at the Spring Game representing their $1 million gift in support of Emerging Scholars students.

Businessman and Clemson trustee Mark Richardson and his wife, Kathryn, and family have given $1 million for a scholarship fund to help ensure that all Emerging Scholars students accepted into Clemson University can attend with financial aid.

Since 2002, the University’s Emerging Scholars program has made higher education a reality for students at five high schools along the I-95 corridor who may not have seen college in their future. Selected rising high school sophomores, juniors and seniors attend the residential program on the Clemson campus in three separate summer experiences. They enroll in courses and workshops that prepare them to graduate high school and apply for college.

During the academic school year, these students participate in college-access workshops and exercises at a local community college. They also visit colleges and universities in South Carolina, Georgia and North Carolina. To date all of the program’s students have graduated from high school. Ninety percent of them attend college or join the military their first year out of high school. The Richardson gift is designated to help the students who are accepted into and decide to attend Clemson.

“I am grateful to Mark and Kathryn for their support of our Emerging Scholars students,” said President Clements. “This gift will make a Clemson education accessible to generations of students who may not have thought that college was in their reach. The Richardsons are truly making a difference for these students and for Clemson.”

“My family and I believe that every student, regardless of financial need, who wishes to develop their greatest abilities through education should have that chance. This gift is the beginning of an effort to ensure that any Emerging Scholar who wants to come to Clemson University can,” Richardson said.

Thirteen alumni of the Emerging Scholars program have attended and graduated from Clemson. Six more are currently enrolled. With the help of this scholarship, 13 incoming freshmen have been admitted for this fall.

Chuck Knepfle, Clemson’s associate vice president for enrollment management, said, “The Emerging Scholars program does a fantastic job of preparing their students for college. With the help of this gift, we now can recruit them to Clemson without worrying about it being affordable. The Richardson gift, along with a significant scholarship commitment made by the University, greatly reduces, and for some students eliminates, the financial barrier for the next 10 years, but a sizable endowment is needed for the financial support to continue forever.”

Emerging Scholars Program Manager Amber Lange acknowledged the impact of the Richardsons’ generosity. “The goal of Emerging Scholars is not only to change a student’s life but to make college accessible in communities where there is not always a clear path to success,” she said. “This gift from the Richardsons will help our students attain a valuable Clemson degree and make sure the financial burden they often feel is lifted.”

The gift is a part of the successful $1 billion Will to Lead for Clemson campaign to support students and faculty with scholarships, professorships, facilities, technology and enhanced opportunities for learning and research.

Gantt scholars and donors recognized

Forever-Gantt Scholars1

The 2015-2016 class of Gantt Scholars

Members of this year’s class of Gantt Scholars were recognized this spring at a reception that featured remarks by Jim Bostic ’69, Ph.D. ’72, the first African-American to receive a Ph.D. from Clemson, and Lee Gill, the University’s new chief diversity officer.

The Clemson Black Alumni Council established the Harvey B. Gantt Scholarship Endowment Fund in 1988 to honor Gantt and to recruit and retain African-American students, with special preference to South Carolina residents and entering freshmen.

In his remarks, President Clements said that Harvey Gantt’s admission to the University was a major milestone in Clemson’s transformation from an all-male, all-white military college to a civilian co-educational desegregated public university. “I applaud him for his persistence and his incredible resolve many years ago to fight the battle to attend Clemson,” said Clement. “As a result, Clemson is better and stronger today.”

2016 Distinguished Service Award

DSA Award_024dEVERY YEAR THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION accepts nominations for the Distinguished Service Award, the highest honor bestowed upon a former student.

This year’s honorees are, as the name of the award says, a distinguished lot. They have been recognized by their peers professionally for impressive achievements. They have contributed to their communities both publicly and privately, serving on boards and volunteering without expectation of reward or recognition. They have stayed connected with Clemson, giving back in time and talent and resources to benefit current and future students.

At their core, more than anything else, these folks reflect those characteristics that define Clemson University. They are visionary, bold, competitive, determined and proud. They value family, tradition and loyalty. And they love orange. They are Tigers, through and through.

The pages of this magazine don’t contain enough space to list their many accomplishments and achievements or the numerous ways they have found to make their communities better places to live and Clemson a better place to learn. We’d have to double the pages to enumerate their activities as students and their involvement as alumni.

Here they are, this year’s Distinguished Service Award honorees, with just a sampling of what makes them stand out.

Bryant Barnes4aBryant Graves Barnes ’76
Rock Hill, South Carolina
President and CEO, Comporium

Quiet yet affirmative leadership

Bryant Barnes is the fourth generation of his family to lead Comporium, a Rock Hill-based telecommunications company, and his leadership has resulted in a dynamic, streamlined and progressive company. Under his leadership, Comporium partnered with the city of Rock Hill to transform an eyesore of an empty parking lot into Fountain Park and is now working to transform a vacant textile mill into a bustling mixed-use development. Barnes has been deeply involved with area charitable organizations in support of children, health care and education.

Under his leadership, Comporium also contributed $1 million in 2009 to the Optoelectronics Research Center of Economic Excellence in the Holcombe Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Barnes was one of the founding partners of the Barker Scholars Endowment, and the Barnes family contributed $1 million to repurpose the Sheep Barn at Clemson to be “The Barnes Center,” in honor of his father. Comporium is the latest Founding Innovation Partner of the University’s Watt Family Innovation Center, to which they have pledged $3 million in financial support and in-kind products and services.

 

Janine Bowen026aJanine Anthony Bowen ‘89, M ‘91
Atlanta, Georgia
Shareholder, LeClairRyan PC

Diplomatic problem solver

With a master’s in industrial engineering and experience working with Andersen Consulting and IBM, Janine Bowen went on to earn a law degree. She rose to partner at McKenna, Long & Aldridge, then founded JACK Attorneys and Advisors, a technology and intellectual property firm. The list of organizations she serves makes it clear that she has a strong commitment to the poor and homeless in her community.

In her Clemson involvement, Bowen exhibits what one colleague called “a remarkable and rare collaborative dynamic,” displaying an analytical approach that would allow her to identify potential problems and recommend solutions. She has been the face of the Clemson family to many students in industrial engineering, providing support financially and through volunteerism. She established an endowment for the department in 2009, and an endowment supporting the PEER (Programs for Educational Enrichment and Retention) in 2011 in honor of her mother.

 

Grant Burns11aE. Grantland “Grant” Burns ’88
Greer, South Carolina
Vice president and general counsel, AFL

A leader through challenges

As an attorney with two prominent firms in Greenville, Grant Burns represented clients in trials and arbitrations in 20 states. He moved on to corporate practice with AFL, a telecommunications firm, along the way being named one of Greenville’s “Best and Brightest, 35 and Under.” He has broad community involvement, with membership on boards of organizations that provide housing, shelter and economic development.

He served as president of the Clemson Alumni Association during the transition that changed the group into a smaller Alumni Board and larger Alumni Council, leading that process with courage and foresight. One colleague commented that she did “not recall having seen someone who has had an impact [on Clemson] in such varied ways, prior to turning 50.” He has demonstrated his love for Clemson through the use of his time, the sharing of his talents and the gift of his resources.

 

Leslie Dunlap Callison02aLeslie Dunlap Callison ’81
Lexington, South Carolina
Community Technology Advisor, Connect South Carolina

Consensus builder

Leslie Callison has had a lasting impact on the future economic development and educational success of many counties in South Carolina through her collaborative approach to assisting them in achieving technology certification. Committed to her local community as well, she was a founding director of Columbia’s EdVenture Children’s Museum and extensively involved in supporting her children’s schools.

Her consensus building approach was essential as she chaired the task force charged with implementing a reorganization of the Clemson Alumni Association and its governance structure, resulting in the engagement of more volunteers and enhanced vitality and responsibility. She served as president of the Alumni Association the following year, a position her father also held. She has been a loyal and vocal defender of Clemson and is recognized in Columbia as “that woman who wears orange 365 days a year.”

 

Doug Richardson016aDouglas “Doug” Duke Richardson ‘64
Clemson, South Carolina
Retired, Director of Finance & Administration for Institutional Advancement and Treasurer, Clemson University Foundation

Humble servant leader

Doug Richardson brought what he had learned during his distinguished career in banking and consulting to a position at Clemson, leading the Clemson University Foundation to great achievement, establishing structures, formalizing procedures and methodologies, and stewarding significant growth of endowments. He helped lead the real estate acquisition, financing and development of CU-ICAR. He is a veteran, with tours of duty at the Quartermaster Depot in Philadelphia and in Vietnam. In his church, he has served as a leader, peacemaker, mentor for youth and bridge builder between persons of different backgrounds and perspectives.

Active on the Class of ‘64 reunion committee, Richardson, along with his wife Wilmer, has supported current and future students through a legacy gift for the class endowment, which supports the Academic Success Center and a scholarship endowment, and the Kappa Delta Chi Brotherhood Scholarship Endowment for students with financial needs.

 

“The Distinguished Service Award honors individuals who are dedicated to enhancing the quality and value of our University. I want to personally thank our award winners for giving so generously of their time and talents for professional and public service. Their personal accomplishments serve as a wonderful model for our current and future students.”

— Clemson President James P. Clements

 

 

 

Bowl games bring out the Orange

Orange Bowl Feeding 6The Orange Bowl and the National Championship this season put the spotlight on Clemson Clubs in the Miami and Phoenix areas. Both cities turned orange as Clemson fans showed up in mass for the games.

Orange-bedecked fans also visited the Grand Canyon in droves, making it look like it should be a Clemson attraction, rather than a national park.

Clubs in both cities, with the help of the Alumni Association, organized an array of activities that included service projects, tailgates, pep rallies and other pre-game events. Clemson alumni and fans so impressed the chair of the Arizona Sports and Tourism Authority that he sent a letter to South Carolina newspapers.

“Clemson may not have won the title, but the Tigers and their followers left a lasting and positive impression in the Valley of the Sun this week,” he wrote. “Local residents, business owners and dignitaries were so impressed with the way Clemson fans conducted themselves during the team’s first trip to the desert.”

Clemson fans are confident that it won’t be the last.

Impacting Others: Laneika Mattress Musalini M ’11

Laneika Musalini

Laneika Musalini has committed her life to transforming the lives of others through servant leadership.

In 2009, Musalini founded the nonprofit organization, Women’s Empowerment Inc., which has positively affected over 1,400 women since its inception. The program aims to empower women through support, education and networking; additionally, it promotes the well-being of women and encourages positive female role models in communities. Musalini also serves with Accept. Inspire. Minister., and Young Professionals of Anderson Area Chamber of Commerce.

“If I can change the life of one person, if I can make a difference in the world, if my works lead another to grace, my life is not in vain,” Musalini said.

A graduate of Clemson’s Human Resource Development master’s program, Musalini also works full time as director of grants at Tri-County Technical College. There, she strategizes proposal development, seeks out funding opportunities and creates industry partnerships.

“I have worked and collaborated with some really great people who share the same goal I do: building the workforce and strengthening the economy,” Musalini said.

Musalini’s hometown of Anderson has taken notice of her, too. This past summer, she received the ATHENA Young Professional Award®. This accolade honors an upcoming leader committed to achieving personal and professional accomplishments, devoting efforts to community and serving as a role model for young women.

“I have come to realize that my life is not about me, but about the impact that I have on others,” says Musalini.

Musalini and her husband, Wadud, live in Anderson with her four children, one of whom entered Clemson fall 2015 as a Gates Millennium Scholar.

“My family is so much fun! We are Tiger fanatics and have no bias. As long as it is a Tiger sport, we are cheering!”

Roaring 10 Recognized

Clockwise from upper left: Harrison Trammell, Rick Joye, Matthew Pencek, Matthew Bundrick, Darris Means, Brian Collie, Jessica Barron Martin, Joseph Branch II, Stephanie Sox, and Scott Sampson.

Clockwise from upper left: Harrison Trammell, Rick Joye, Matthew Pencek, Matthew Bundrick, Darris Means, Brian Collie, Jessica Barron Martin, Joseph Branch II, Stephanie Sox, and Scott Sampson.

Clemson has recognized 10 young alumni for their impact in business, leadership, community, educational and philanthropic endeavors. This year’s Roaring 10 were selected for their commitment to Clemson’s core values of honesty, integrity and respect, and as well as involvement with and contributions to the University.

Brian Collie ’04, M ’06 of Mount Pleasant leads tax, estate planning and real estate practice for Buxton and Collie LLC. He is involved with the Clemson Emerging Scholars Program and served as a member of the Clemson University MBA Alumni Council.

Darris Means ’07 of Athens, Georgia, is an assistant professor at the University of Georgia in the counseling and human development services department and college student affairs administration program. He serves on Clemson’s Higher Education and Student Affairs External Education Advisory Board.

Harrison Trammell ’06 of Charleston is an associate at Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice LLP. He has the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) credential and is a member of South Carolina’s chapter of the U.S. Green Building Council. He participated in the Clemson Alumni Council from 2012 to 2014, serving as president of Clemson Young Alumni Council in 2013.

Jessica Barron Martin ’07, M ’09 of Charleston is a vice president in Wells Fargo’s real estate group. She participates in Clemson’s Real Estate Alumni Society and is president of Clemson in the Lowcountry. She formerly served as co-chair of the Wells Fargo Lowcountry Volunteer Chapter and was president of the Greater Orlando Clemson Club.

Joseph Branch II ’05 of Alexandria, Virginia, has been deployed eight times since graduation. His outstanding performance in the U.S. Army Special Operations command led to his selection for an Army Inter-Agency Fellowship with the National Geospatial Agency. He continues to support Clemson’s ROTC program and Tiger athletics.

Matthew Bundrick ’07 of Clemson serves as Clemson Creative Services’ director of web services. In addition to playing a critical role in the development of Clemson’s websites, he has been highly involved with the Staff Senate since 2010, serving as president from 2014-2015.

Matthew Pencek ’10 of Washington, D.C., works for MorganFranklin Consulting and has been recognized as a “Top Consultant Under 35” by trade associations. He is a College of Business and Behavioral Science Tiger Ties mentor and is involved with the Baltimore/D.C. Clemson Club.

Rick Joye ’97, M ’06 of Greenville is an executive at Michelin North America and a supply chain manager for 10 Michelin manufacturing plants in the U.S., Canada and Mexico. He also founded Sustaining Way, a nonprofit that brings together diverse individuals and organizations to find affordable ways to care for people while caring for the environment.

Scott Sampson ’08, M ’10 of Clemson currently serves as Young Alumni annual giving officer. Young alumni giving has increased each year Sampson has held the position. He also is involved in Clemson’s chapter of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes and continues to give campus tours as an ambassador.

Stephanie Sox ’07 of Columbia is executive director of the S.C. Soybean Board, representing the state’s 1,800 soybean farmers. She also serves as the Certified S.C. Grown Palmetto Series project manager and was selected as a 2014 National Top Ten Finalist for the American Farm Bureau Excellence in Agriculture Award. She is a College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences alumni board member.