Posts

When in Tokyo

Justin Prescott '09

Welcome to Tokyo! I’m Justin Prescott, class of 2009. I majored in economics and minored in Japanese at Clemson. I work at EY Japan in strategy consulting and lead Clemson’s (still unofficial) alumni group in Japan. I’ve spent my professional career in Japan, Indonesia and Singapore, but I’ve spent the most time in Tokyo, so let me show you around.

1| Tokyo Station

Tokyo Station

Located on the eastern side of the city, Tokyo Station is a popular attraction as it was recently renovated with its iconic brick façade preserved. The surrounding area has a number of buildings famous for their mixture of new and old architecture, like the Kitte building. For food and drink, I recommend the ninth floor of the Shin-Maru building, which has a terrace overlooking Tokyo Station.

PRO TIP: Compared to Shibuya and west Tokyo, the crowd around here is more mature, making this area great for date night.

2| The Imperial Palace

Just a short walk away from Tokyo Station, the Imperial Palace grounds are beautiful — perfect for a jog to cure your jet lag. Although the central area of the palace is only accessible on rare occasions, there is still plenty to see, especially if you’re able to visit when the cherry trees are in bloom.

3| Kichijoji/Inokashira Park

Kichijoji_Credit Alex Queen

Photo by Alex Queen

Located a bit outside of the city, Kichijoji is a neighborhood escape from the busy central Tokyo atmosphere. Inokashira Park is home to the Ghibli Museum, a must for Studio Ghibli fans, and Kichijoji has good shopping options with both high brands and quirky secondhand clothiers.

4| Shibuya

One of Tokyo’s most famous areas and the site of the world’s busiest pedestrian intersection (the Shibuya Scramble), Shibuya is a great place to visit, especially for the younger crowd looking for solid night life, food that you probably should only eat while you’re still young and all-night karaoke.

PRO TIP: Check out Dogenzaka for a picture with the iconic Hachiko statue.

5| Ebisu

Ebisu

Although Ebisu is just one stop from Shibuya by train, the vibe is totally different. Home to the headquarters of Sapporo and Ebisu beer, Ebisu claims some great upscale restaurants, including M House for western-style brunch, Day & Night Café — one of the only places in Tokyo to get a real pulled pork barbecue sandwich, y’all — and the famous Afuri Ramen shop.

PRO TIP: For a more daring culinary experience, go to Niku-Zushi, which serves sushi using nearly raw beef.

Yokohama, Japan: Meagan Hoffman ’13, Tate Fennell ’11 and Lauren McDonald ’15

In May, I had the opportunity to travel to Yokohama, Japan for business with Nissan North America. I traveled with fellow Clemson alumna Meagan Hoffman ’13 and met up with Tate Fennell ’11 — who is currently on Nissan North America foreign assignment in Japan. We spent two weeks analyzing and optimizing packaging for a new program model coming up during this fiscal year. It was a great experience exploring Japan with some fellow Tigers!

Singapore: Jarrett Lucero ’13

After graduating from Clemson in 2013, I took an engineer position at a medical device company in Pendleton, SC. After one year, I entered the PhD program at Clemson for Materials Science and Engineering. I was working full time, doing research, and taking classes for almost two years.

In 2016 I felt a different calling in life. I could no longer ignore the voice in my head telling me that I wasn’t where I needed to be. So, to the confusion of my parents, I left my company in October of 2016 and began remotely consulting for online businesses.

You could call it a pivot.

Since I could work anywhere there was WiFi, I went all in and bought a two-month ticket to Vietnam. I had no friends that lived there and no one to travel with. I didn’t even make travel plans until I got to Asia, I just loaded my stuff into a backpack and climbed on a plane.

Some highlights:

Hiroshima, Japan was absolutely moving. You see buildings that survived the atomic blast in 1945. When you stand next to them, inside the rebuilt city, it is a very powerful experience.

Singapore was great, too. I say it is perfect for those who don’t want to get culture shocked too hard. It is very high tech, modern, clean, safe, with excellent transportation, and enough Indian and Asian culture to satisfy the junior traveler.

Chiang Mai, Thailand is the Asian hub for people working remotely (called Digital Nomads) and it’s clear why. It’s a really fun, smaller city at the foot of the mountains. I miss the night time food markets and weaving a moped through aggressive traffic.

In Hanoi, I found a bar with an open mic night and got to play a short concert.

In Thailand, I signed up for a 2-day retreat through a monk university. We spent 2 days in near-total silence learning about Buddhism, the life of a monk, and spent hours each day meditating using the methods they taught to us.

My advice to future travelers would be:

Pack and repack your bag several times so you know where to trim down your belongings. I had to ship half my stuff home midway through the trip. Although it was expensive, having a lighter backpack made a huge difference.

Don’t be intimidated by the local language or culture. Almost anywhere you go in the world, you will find friendly people willing to help you. If you learn about 5 basic phrases in each language you can survive a few weeks. Be polite, respectful, and get comfortable communicating with your hands.

Finally, don’t overthink it. The world is basically one big back yard with really good food everywhere. Do some basic research on where you’re going and just… go!

In the picture above, I’m on top of the Marina Bay Sands hotel in Singapore. More photographs at www.instagram.com/jarrettlucero

Alumni gather in Japan

Japan Clemson1A group of alumni, former faculty, exchange students and current students are beginning the process to form a Clemson Club in Japan. They recently gathered in Tokyo with a group of about 12, including former faculty members Toshiko and Yuji Kishimoto, at an izakaya (a Japanese gastropub) for drinks and food and then went to an Italian bar. They closed out the evening with another mixture of cultures: a traditional Japanese-style event closing punctuated with the cadence count.