Posts

Business school receives press valued at nearly $1 million

Printing press giant, Nilpeter has completely outfitted a FB-3 13-inch fully automated servo press at Clemson University Graphics Communication Center in Godfrey Hall. Professor Kern Cox and students observed its operation.

Clemson’s nationally recognized graphic communications program just got better, thanks to a nearly $1 million gift-in-kind from global press supplier Nilpeter Inc. The state-of-the-art flexographic printing press will enable the University to build on its reputation as one of the nation’s leaders in printing and packaging design education by providing students with this cutting-edge teaching tool.

“Nilpeter’s gift is an investment in the next generation of packaging design leaders,” said President Clements. “We appreciate, and are honored, that Nilpeter recognizes Clemson as a leader in preparing high-caliber printing and packaging design professionals for the industry.” Clemson’s graphic communications program has long been recognized as a national leader in packaging design and printing education with a hands-on approach that gives students an employability advantage. The program boasts a 95 percent employment rate upon graduation.

“Our students understand marketplace competitiveness and how implementing technology can keep companies strong and innovative,” said Charles “Chip” Tonkin, department chair. “The value of this gift extends to potential employers in that they want students who know how to utilize and implement the latest technologies to stay competitive. We appreciate that Nilpeter believes in our students and faculty to invest this level of commitment in Clemson and the industry.”

A global printing company with nearly 100 years of engineering expertise in printing, Nilpeter serves businesses in 65 countries with high-quality label and narrow-web printing solutions. “Nilpeter is strongly committed to the education of the next generation of printers. By operating the latest and most innovative technology, we aim to inspire skilled students to positively influence the printing industry in the years to come,” said Lars Eriksen, CEO and owner of Nilpeter.

Donnie A. Dinch ’08

Passion for music inspires technology

donnie-dinchDonnie Dinch is forecast to take the billion-dollar music industry mobile. He’s listed in Forbes magazine’s “30 Under 30” and as one of the magazine’s “Hottest Startups of 2013.” And who’s to argue with Forbes?

Dinch is the packaging science-graduate-package designer-turned-CEO of WillCall. After graduating in 2008 with a degree in packaging science, Dinch moved to Seattle where it wasn’t long before he and two friends picked up on discussions around plans for developing an app during a startup weekend.

Dinch saw that streaming services were — and still are — altering the face of consumerism in the music business. A larger number of artists are being brought to people’s attention, but they’re playing toward smaller venues at the club level. The mobile app facilitates an environment where people can find out about live performances and can go see more of the music they love, but that they just might not have the right information to find. WillCall’s features include curated events, a “Tip” button that sends tips directly to the artist, in-app merchandise, friend activity feed and custom packages, and Bartab, a means to charge drinks to their WillCall account. With more than $2.1 million in seed funding from billionaire Sean Parker, music mogul Coran Capshaw and Airbnb cofounder Joe Gebbia, Dinch’s app is currently curating shows in New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles. The goal is to facilitate people seeing a show as often and as easily as going to a coffee shop. Dinch’s passion for music led him to create the business. A resident of San Francisco, he works with the city on a panel series called Nightlife & New Tech. Their mission is to harness the brainpower of those in the city’s tech and music industries to improve the future of nightlife in San Francisco. He also works with a nonprofit dedicated to using the power of technology for civic action.