Posts

Celebrating two endowed chairs

At a celebration of two SMARTSTATE endowed chairs, John Ballato, holder of the J.E. Sirrine Foundation Endowed Chair in Optical Fiber, and Anjali Joseph, holder of the Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System Endowed Chair in Architecture + Health Care Design, are pictured with President Clements. At the luncheon, donors and professors were presented with endowed chair medallions.

Indigo Pine finishes strong

Congratulations to the Clemson team for their amazing performance in this year’s Solar Decathlon, held in October in Irvine, California. They finished sixth overall among a global field, ranking second in both the architecture and communications sections and third in the market appeal section of the competition.

Indigo Pine, the Clemson team’s house, was made possible by scores of sponsors and donors whose contributions included time, knowledge, money and materials. Hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy in collaboration with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the Solar Decathlon challenges 20 colleges and universities to design, build and operate solar-powered houses that are cost-effective, energy-efficient and attractive.

For more about the Indigo Pine project and the many donors who made it possible, as well as videos about the process, go to clemson.edu/indigopine.

A vision with no boundaries

Fisk works with students in the Pearce Center.

Fisk works with students in the Pearce Center.

It began in the 1980s when Robert Roy Pearce ’41 developed a belief that colleges should improve the writing and communication skills of students from all majors. As a Clemson alumnus who came from a long line of successful businessmen, Pearce decided to craft a plan designed to strengthen Tigers’ communication skills. So in 1989, Roy and wife, Margery “Marnie” Pearce, donated $1.5 million to Clemson to endow the Roy and Marnie Pearce Center for Professional Communication.

When Pearce and the other members of the Class of 1941 celebrated their 60th anniversary, they provided the University with a million-dollar gift to fund the construction of the Class of 1941 Studio, which opened its doors in Daniel Hall in 2004 and became the home of the Pearce Center.

The center has three signature initiatives — the Writing Fellows Program, the Internship Program and the Client-Based Program — all of which are designed to integrate students into real-world situations.

The Writing Fellows Program was formed through a collaboration between the Pearce Center and the Honors College. Writing Fellows mentor and provide peer editing for other students.

In the Internship Program, students immerse themselves in the world of professional communication and work on many long-term projects including writing, editing, video production and graphic design.

The Client-Based Program was started in 2003 by the late Summer Smith Taylor, whose goal was to give students the opportunity to practice what they are learning in the classroom. Students assist with client projects ranging from website development and social media plans to rebranding. “The program matches classes to clients who need deliverables,” said Ashley Fisk, assistant director of the Pearce Center and director of the Client-Based Program.

The center has made an impact on Clemson as a whole by contributing to the University’s efforts to teach writing across the curriculum, for which the University has been recognized by U.S.News & World Report. The 2016 ranking places Clemson among recognized schools such as Brown, Harvard and Duke.

The Pearces will always be remembered for their support, generosity and dedication to student success. Along with improving the communication skills of Clemson students, the couple established the Dr. R. Roy Pearce HD ’41 & Margery W. Pearce Library Endowment and provided funding for student scholarships.

Due to their generosity, the Pearces were inducted last fall into the Fort Hill Legacy Society, which honors donors posthumously for leaving $1 million or more to the University in their estate plans. A ceremony dedicating a bronze leaf in the Pearces’ memory was held as part of the annual Legacy Day celebration. The leaves are placed under the Second Century Oak, which stands at Fort Hill on the historic site of the Trustee Oak and the University’s first Board of Trustees meeting.

For more information about how you can include Clemson in your estate plan, contact Jovanna King at jovanna@clemson.edu or 864-656-0663, or go to clemson.edu/giving.

Spiro Founder Society pledges $1.7 million challenge

A group of successful alumni entrepreneurs from a range of industries and academic disciplines have united to form the Spiro Founder Society. Collectively, they are offering a $1.7 million dollar challenge pledge to the University’s Arthur M. Spiro Institute for Entrepreneurial Leadership to inspire the next generation of Clemson entrepreneurs.

The challenge pledge offers to match, up to $1.7 million, all donations made to the Spiro Institute that will enhance education, outreach and research in this field.

Founded in 1994, the Spiro Institute provides an educational and research program in entrepreneurship that contributes to the economic development of the region, state and nation. The focus is on wealth creation through entrepreneurial activity.

“Rather than disparate initiatives isolated in individual colleges or even majors, we believe that one funded institute serving Clemson as a whole will leverage the energy and money to the fullest potential,” said Greg Smith, president of Blue Vista Ventures and leader of the effort to form the Spiro Founder Society. “It is also helpful to consolidate our many efforts across campus so that anyone seeking to participate knows where to go to ‘plug-in’ or get help.”

The Spiro Founder Society will support ongoing Spiro Institute initiatives across campus such as undergraduate and graduate entrepreneurship courses, Creative Inquiry projects for launching start-up companies, a living-learning community and two speaker series.

Tiger Band Association adds to endowment

Pictured are (from front left) Richard Goodstein, dean, College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities; Tom Waldrop, CUTBA president; Drew Bismack, Tiger Band member and CUTBA student board member; Brian O’Rourke; associate vice president, University Advancement; and Mark Spede, Tiger Band director; (back left) Tony Stapleton, CUTBA founding member; Larry Sloan, CUTBA founder; LaRon Stewart, CUTBA board member; Walter Betsell, CUTBA board member.

Pictured are (from front left) Richard Goodstein, dean, College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities; Tom Waldrop, CUTBA president; Drew Bismack, Tiger Band member and CUTBA student board member; Brian O’Rourke; associate vice president, University Advancement; and Mark Spede, Tiger Band director; (back left) Tony Stapleton, CUTBA founding member; Larry Sloan, CUTBA founder; LaRon Stewart, CUTBA board member; Walter Betsell, CUTBA board member.

The band that shakes the Southland has a backup group like no other.

The Clemson University Tiger Band Association (CUTBA) has once again made its annual gift to the Clemson University Tiger Band Association Scholarship Award Program, this time with a $24,000 check to the endowment.

Established in 1987, the fund has received more than $800,000 from CUTBA. CUTBA uses the money to support Tiger Band members primarily with annual scholarships and award recognition, but in other ways as well, such as providing breakfast for band members before noon football games and providing fourth-year members with Tiger Band watches, which have become treasured mementos for outgoing seniors. Last year, CUTBA created academic regalia for the band students to wear during graduation ceremonies.

AIG establishes center, endows professorship

Bruce Clarke, global engineering training manager for AIG Global Property, conducts fire systems training at Clemson’s Advanced Materials Research Center. AIG engineers from South Africa, India, Australia, Brazil, England, Germany and the U.S. participated in the first class held as part of a newly established AIG-Clemson collaboration. AIG has invested $4 million to establish a Risk Engineering and Analytics Center and endow the Robert Benmosche Professorship in honor of the company’s former president and CEO.