Bring Your Daughter to Clemson weekend 

Bring your daughters_9763This spring, alumni and their daughters came to campus for Bring Your Daughter to Clemson, an opportunity for parents to share their love of the University with their daughters. Girls ages 6-18 toured campus, learned about majors and student activities, met students and professors, and got a small taste of what it means to be a Clemson Tiger. More than 200 participated in the weekend event sponsored by the Women’s Alumni Council.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Best in Show: Christine Tedesco ’82, ’85, M ’90

Christine Tedesco_022For Christine Tedesco art and life all bleed into one. Art is life. Life is art.

Nothing is an imitation. Each building she’s designed as an architect with a team is just as much a piece of her as a quilt she’s created alone for the couch at home.

Her creative pursuits led to a “Best in Show” at the Anderson Arts Center 41st Juried Arts Show this past spring for a quilt named “Beige #1.” It was one of more than 500 entries in the show. She’s also shown pieces at the Mint Museum in Charlotte, N.C., the Ogden Museum in New Orleans and Art Fields in Lake City.

“I think the first thing I made was an apron,” said Tedesco. She began sewing when she was age nine, and as she grew, the instructions from her mother grew from stitches to life lessons on careers.

“My mother was very adamant that I had to major in something I could do so I didn’t have to depend on a man,” said Tedesco. Her love of making things led to a career as an architect, where she now leads at RSCT architecture + design.

But she didn’t leave behind her personal creative time just because she was being artistic at her day job. Instead she wanted to challenge herself to be innovative. At age 29 she took sewing to the next level and began quilting. “I wanted to try something more difficult,” she said. She also took a tailoring class and tackled making a man’s suit.

Even graduate school was taken as a confrontation to defy daily life. “I just came to the conclusion, there’s got to be more to life than this. My mind was cut open and things were poured in. I had such a great time. It was probably one of the biggest challenges of my life, but my desire to learn was different.”

Like many artists or creative types, Tedesco is driven by desire. “I get an idea in my head and it doesn’t leave until I figure out what I’m going to do. I never use a pattern.” Even her use of color isn’t conventional as she doesn’t follow traditional color relationships, but instead gut reaction to the ways a red or an orange can paint a purple or a blue a different hue. “I don’t follow patterns because colors inform me in a way what to do with them.”

In “Beige #1,” the piece wasn’t about color at all, but instead about the relationships of the seams and how they intersect. “I just started mapping lines and free form — it’s a lot less color,” she said.

Tedesco said she tries to be disciplined about her work. Each piece takes about 40 to 80 hours. A bedroom in her Pendleton home serves as a studio.

Unlike her work office, which has clean lines and barely a trace of a paper trail from the day’s work, her studio showcases years of ideas. Quilting books stacked about 4-feet tall stand by the door. Scraps of a current orange, beige and black piece are pinned tall and high on the wall.

“When you make a piece of art, it’s a solitary activity. … That’s why I create art. It allows me to do something alone.”

Britt honored for achievement in research

May 6, 2016 - Clemson University President James P. Clements lauded the accomplishments of faculty and staff and acknowledged work to be done to move Clemson forward during the May 6, year-end general faculty meeting. Outstanding faculty members were honored, and the president cited achievements driving Clemson to new heights in the world of academics. Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost Bob Jones presented awards of achievement to four outstanding faculty and staff members: Chris Heavner, Bruce Martin, Thomas Britt, and Michael Sehorn.

Outstanding faculty members were honored, and the president cited achievements driving Clemson to new heights in the world of academics. Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost Bob Jones presented awards of achievement to four outstanding faculty and staff members: Chris Heavner, Bruce Martin, Thomas Britt, and Michael Sehorn.

Psychology professor Thomas Britt received the Alumni Award for Outstanding Achievement in Research, given by the Alumni Association and the Provost’s Office to tenured or tenure-track faculty members who have conducted research in residence for at least five years. The award was presented in May at the final faculty meeting of the academic year.

“[Britt] has published 70 empirical articles since his arrival here at Clemson, as well as nine books and 40 book chapters. Dr. Britt has 11 different papers that have been cited at least 100 times and his total research program is now approaching 5,000 total citations,” said Alumni Association Executive Director Wil Brasington. “[His] research moves us forward as an institution and makes us better as a society.”

Learn more about Britt at clemson.edu.

 

 

Alumni Association sponsors first Career Fair

CareerFair4Over 100 alumni and 30 employers participated in the Alumni Association’s first Alumni Career Fair in May. The event, held at CU-ICAR’s TD Gallery in Greenville, offered alumni the opportunity to explore career options with area employers as well as network with other alumni.

This career fair was sponsored by Alumni Career Services, which was launched based on feedback from previous alumni surveys. There are plans to expand with events in areas where there are large numbers of alumni, and eventually to offer events through clubs across the county. If your company is interested in participating in an Alumni Career Fair, contact Deborah Cremer at dcremer@clemson.edu.

Inaugural Give Day exceeds expectations

Give Day donations will support student, faculty and facility needs.

Give Day donations will support student, faculty and facility needs.

This spring, the Clemson family showed its generosity, with more than 3,000 donors giving more than $900,000 to support student, faculty, staff and facility needs during the inaugural Give Day event on April 6, also Clemson Founder’s Day.

“We asked the Clemson family and friends to help support the University on Give Day, and they did that and more,” said Brian O’Rourke, vice president for Development and Alumni Relations. “Their generosity exceeded our expectations. We thank them on behalf of our present and future students who are the ultimate beneficiaries of these gifts.”

The gifts from alumni, students, faculty, staff and supporters — totaling $903,883.76 — helped the University exceed this year’s $105 million private fundraising goal, with a record-breaking $149 million in support of the Will to Lead capital campaign.

Among Give Day donors was a couple who pledged $250,000 and Hubbell Lighting Inc., a corporate leader, with its $10,000 gift that will provide five $2,000 scholarships. More than half of the gifts were made online. There were 1,608 posts on social media — mostly Twitter — about Give Day.
To the donors, O’Rourke said, “Thank you for helping us get one step closer to the end zone of our Will to Lead capital campaign. Your gifts will leave a lasting impact.”
You can find more information about Give Day at clemson.edu/giveday/.