Esko gift-in-kind enhances student experience

Clemson University student Mengmeng Zhao, a third-year doctoral student in packaging science from Tianjin, China, uses a computerized sample cutting table in the Sonoco Institute of Packaging Design and Graphics that was funded by Esko Inc., Oct. 24, 2016.

Clemson University student Mengmeng Zhao, a third-year doctoral student in packaging science from Tianjin, China, uses a computerized sample cutting table in the Sonoco Institute of Packaging Design and Graphics that was funded by Esko Inc., Oct. 24, 2016. (Photo by Ken Scar)

Clemson students will work with cutting-edge design equipment, software and tools for years to come, thanks to Esko, a global supplier of integrated solutions for the packaging, labels, sign and display industries.

The company has given Clemson’s Sonoco Institute of Packaging Design and Graphics equipment, maintenance and software valued at $26,703,750 over a five-year period.

“Esko has been a great partner with the Sonoco Institute for nearly a decade, and this latest gift will be instrumental in Clemson’s ongoing efforts to remain at the leading edge of research into packaging technologies,” said President Clements. “Esko’s equipment and software allow our packaging design students to leave Clemson proficient in industry-standard tools and technologies.” The Sonoco Institute is the only university program in the country with a multidisciplinary approach to packaging as a core competency.

Esko has been a partner of the institute since 2008, and the curriculum is built around the company’s equipment and software. “Esko values the Clemson relationship largely because of the amount of value the printing and packaging industry places on Clemson as a resource for talent and innovation,” said Larry Moore, Esko’s vice president of partner programs in North America.

The partnership has greatly benefited Clemson students and consequently the manufacturing industry, said Chip Tonkin, director of the Sonoco Institute and Clemson’s graphic communications department chair. “Our Esko relationship is a world-class example of an industry-academic partnership that leverages real-world tools and relevant challenges to engage and inspire our students in ways that feed the talent pipeline that our entire manufacturing industry desperately needs,” said Tonkin.

Gantt Scholars recognized

In 1963, when Harvey Gantt entered Clemson, he was the first African-American student to do so. Twenty-five years later, the Clemson Black Alumni Council established a scholarship to honor him and to recruit and retain African-American students, with special preference to South Carolina residents and entering freshmen. In February, Harvey and Lucinda Gantt were on campus for a reception to recognize the Harvey B. Gantt Scholars. Senior management major Tre Worthy thanked Gantt for his inspiring leadership. The Gantt Scholars gave Gantt a framed photo of him receiving his diploma in 1965 with the inscription of “Because of you, we can.”

More photos from the reception recognizing the Harvey B. Gantt Scholars.

Gratitude Celebration spotlights Clemson’s faithful donors

At the annual Gratitude Celebration, held the evening of Legacy Day in November, new members were inducted into the Cumulative Giving and Clemson Legacy societies in recognition of their generosity and leadership. The Clemson Legacy Society honors donors who follow the example of Thomas Green and Anna Calhoun Clemson by including the University in their wills or other estate plans. Giving societies honor those whose cumulative gifts to Clemson exceed $100,000. For some inductees, this was their first time in one of the societies; others were honored for moving to a higher level society.

See the full roster of Clemson Legacy society members.

More photos of the Gratitude Celebration.

William Brooks Thayer honored at Legacy Day

The bronze leaves honoring members of the Fort Hill Legacy Society, a posthumous honor for those who have given the University $1 million or more, lie under the trees next to the Calhoun Mansion.

William Brooks Thayer ’52 is the most recent inductee into the Fort Hill Legacy Society, honored with a bronze leaf bearing his name during the Legacy Day celebration in November.

Thayer served his country as an officer in the Air Force and served his community as a talented agricultural engineer. He established the William B. Thayer ’52 Quasi-Endowment for Excellence, designated for Clemson’s areas of greatest need.

Clemson’s Legacy Day was started in 2009 to recognize the fact that Clemson was founded by an act of philanthropy by Anna and Thomas Green Clemson. To learn more about the Fort Hill Legacy Society, or to see pictures of the day’s events, go to clemson.world, and click on “Clemson Forever.”

Learn more about the Fort Hill Legacy Society and other giving societies at Clemson.

See more photos of the Legacy Day events.

Researchers explore economical, environmentally friendly technology

Professors Chris Cole (left) and Philip Brown.

Professors Chris Cole (left) and Philip Brown.

With key support from the Walmart Foundation and its U.S. Manufacturing Innovation Fund, Clemson textile experts are working with the world’s most widely used fiber, polyester, to develop technologies that will make dyeing it more economical and environmentally friendly.

Chris Cole, a faculty member in materials science and engineering, has extensive experience in both textile and apparel design and fabrication, while her collaborator, Philip Brown, also a faculty member in materials science and engineering, is recognized nationally and internationally for his work in designing and extruding textile fibers.

The nearly $1 million award from the Walmart Foundation allows the research team to pursue three primary research objectives: reduce the amount of dyestuff required to color polyester; reduce the energy required to color polyester; and lower the amount of colored effluent from polyester dyeing processes. Effluent is the liquid waste remaining from the dyeing process, and as Cole has noted, “There’s a lot of dye used in dyeing polyester to be able to get the colors that we all know and love like our bright Clemson orange.”

The award was announced by the Walmart Foundation and the U.S. Conference of Mayors at the 2016 meeting of the U.S. Conference of Mayors in Washington, D.C. Clemson is one of five universities conducting research through this opportunity, which is focused on supporting research that strives to create new manufacturing technologies and to reduce the cost of producing goods in the U.S. with the ultimate goal of creating jobs that support America’s growing manufacturing base. Clemson’s award is supporting 2½ years of research.

Within Clemson’s Olin Hall is a unique machine that has enabled the research team to design a polyester fiber that will dye more easily. “The funding provided by the Walmart Foundation has allowed me to build this machine — something that has never been done before — and it’s phenomenal,” said Brown. “There’s only one in the world.” Researchers in the industry have attempted to dye polyester using copolymers, but due to fiber manufacturing technology limitations, they typically used a single polymer. This technology also suffered a very poor wash fastness unlike the technology Brown and his researchers have developed. “We might dye a fabric a brilliant orange, but after it was laundered a few times you could see the color was starting to fade with these other polymers,” said Cole. “Because of Dr. Brown’s expertise and the facilities we have at Clemson, we can now build fibers where we can take advantage of being able to get the dye in quickly with intense colors and excellent dye pickup by the fibers. We’re not leaving as much dye behind at the end of the cycle, but at the same time we’re going to be able to get the wash fastness and the light fastness that the commercial market requires.”

Materials science and engineering makes it a priority to get students involved in projects that provide them with hands-on research experience. “By being part of a major research project, students can see the techniques that we use, how to design a large project, how to build a team effectively for a large project and the communication skills you have to have,” said Cole. Another benefit is that students are introduced to the manufacturers who are their potential employers. With another award from the U.S. Manufacturing Innovation Fund announced this year, these two researchers are optimistic about expanding their research program to look at how they might develop polyester fibers that achieve a high level of water and oil repellency at lower economic and environmental cost.

McCall endows Clemson agriculture college scholarship

Peter LeRoy “Roy” McCall Jr. ’53Continuing in the footsteps of Clemson founder Thomas Green Clemson, who established the University with a legacy of land, Peter LeRoy “Roy” McCall Jr. ’53 has established a new scholarship endowment through a gift of land valued at more than $1 million. The Peter LeRoy “Roy” McCall Jr. ’53 Scholarship Endowment will fund scholarships for students in the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences like Carlos Morales Jr., a freshman agricultural mechanization and business major. “This gift will make a huge difference for students,” said Morales. “The scholarships I received have allowed me the opportunity to attend Clemson, and my decision to attend Clemson was supported by generous donors like Mr. McCall.” “I am proud to know that this gift is an asset to Clemson and to the fellow students who will take advantage of this scholarship program.

I wish the students well,” McCall said when the gift was announced at the South Carolina
Farm Bureau CAFLS Alumni Tailgate in November. “Mr. McCall’s gift will benefit Clemson’s College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences literally forever. It is a demonstration of faith in the future and of faith in Clemson,” said President James P. Clements. McCall earned his bachelor’s degree in agronomy from Clemson in 1953 and has been a long-time supporter of his alma mater. In 2009, he established an endowment to provide Universitywide scholarships that have helped more than 75 students attend Clemson.

He has also supported Clemson’s Scroll of Honor and Military Heritage Plaza, the WestZone project in Memorial Stadium and the Class of 1953 Golden Anniversary Scholarship Endowment. In addition, McCall supports the Clemson University President’s Fund. “Mr. McCall’s gift of a scholarship endowment to the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences will open doors for deserving students to attend CAFLS and will have a direct, positive impact on our ability to educate the next generation of agribusiness leaders,” said George Askew, dean of the college and vice president of Public Service and Agriculture.

Planar, Dell team up with Watt Center as Sustaining Partners

Clemson University professor Saadiqa Kumanyika

Clemson University professor Saadiqa Kumanyika, a lecturer teaching Women in Global Perspective, works with one of the classroom touch screens in the Watt Family Innovation Center that were provided by Planar. (Photo by Ken Scar)

Planar and Dell have become the first two Sustaining Innovation Partners for the Watt Family Innovation Center. Sustaining Innovation Partners provide $1 million or more in support for the Watt Center. Planar, a Leyard company and global leader in display and digital signage technology, supplied the Watt Center with 191 large-format, high-resolution interactive LCD displays and 12 LCD video walls, including the video wall in the auditorium. It is one of the largest interactive LCD video walls the company has implemented.

Planar displays are front and center in the building’s ultra-modern main lobby. Each classroom, hallway and study space throughout the building features Planar LCD displays that can be used by students and teachers for formal or spontaneous collaboration.

Dell, a global computing company, is supporting the Watt Center through a five-year technology grant that will help students, faculty and staff use cutting-edge technology to create and collaborate in the center. Dell will provide deeply discounted equipment software and services to empower innovation and collaboration by students, faculty and staff.

The Watt Center was designed to be an innovative hub where students, faculty and industry partners will collaborate, create, innovate and communicate using state-of-the-art technology and interactive learning systems. Both gifts were part of the Will to Lead for Clemson campaign, launched in 2006 in support of students, faculty, facilities and engaged learning. The campaign surpassed the goal of $1 billion in July.

Lighting the way for future engineers

Jennifer Hibberts

Jennifer Hibberts

Jennifer Hibberts traveled an especially unique path to Clemson, one that spanned nearly 7,000 miles, three generations, and the Eastern and Western Hemispheres. Hibberts grew up on a small Army garrison in the Marshall Islands, located in the Pacific Ocean between Hawaii and the Philippines. About 1,000 people live on the island of Kwajalein, and Hibberts’s high school graduating class had only 18 students.

The laid-back island lifestyle in this tightknit community was all Hibberts had ever known until she enrolled at Clemson in 2014. “I was used to an endless summer, and always being able to relax on a beach in the afternoon or go surfing on the weekends. I had to adapt to the ‘brutal’ winters of the Upstate, and football now fills much of my free time on weekends,” said Hibberts.

Despite growing up thousands of miles away, Hibberts’ family has close ties to Clemson and the Southeast, as her parents are legal residents of South Carolina, and she’s now the eighth woman in her family to attend Clemson. “I’m proud to come from such a successful group of women, and grateful for the opportunity to receive the same quality education that propelled them into the careers they are thriving in,” Hibberts said.

Following in her family’s footsteps, Hibberts quickly forged her own path at Clemson in the biosystems engineering program, Calhoun Honors College, extracurricular activities like the debate team and club water polo team, and her community of friends. Hibberts is also a Grand Challenges Scholar at Clemson. The program, sponsored by the National Academy of Engineers, seeks to equip college students to become well-rounded engineers ready to tackle the world’s largest challenges.

Through the program, Hibberts has been provided opportunities to study abroad in the French Riviera, gain hands-on research experience and network with industry leaders. In spring 2016, Hibberts added another honor when she became one of five inaugural recipients of the Hubbell Lighting Annual Engineering Scholarship, established by Hubbell Lighting to provide scholarships to exceptional engineering students. Hubbell Lighting and the Hubbell Foundation also established the Hubbell Foundation Scholarship Endowment, which will fund scholarships for years to come.

As the recipient of multiple scholarships at Clemson, Hibberts understands the importance of giving back. When she graduates from Clemson in 2018, she plans to apply to the Peace Corps. Hibberts’ experiences growing up in the Marshall Islands and at Clemson have instilled in her a passion for service and a global perspective. “I have been blessed to be able to travel and live in so many places around the world, and it has sparked a deep wanderlust within me,” says Hibberts. “I’d love to continue to live and work overseas.” The gift from Hubbell Lighting and the Hubbell Foundation was part of the successful $1 billion Will to Lead for Clemson campaign.

Siemens provides Clemson with largest ever in-kind technology grant

 

At the announcement of the Siemens gift, a “thought leadership” panel discussion
was moderated by Ted Pitts, president and CEO of the S.C. Chamber of Commerce.
U.S. undersecretary of education Ted Mitchell, automotive engineering graduate student Shweta Rawat, associate professor of mechanical engineering Greg Mocko and adjunct professor of automotive engineering Joerg Schulte discussed the Siemens software and the role of technology in education and Upstate South Carolina’s role in the automotive sector.

Clemson has received the largest grant-in-kind in its history from Siemens, a global technology company. Software valued at more than $357 million will be incorporated into coursework and projects related to computer-aided design, engineering simulation, industrial design, digital manufacturing and manufacturing management in the College of Engineering, Computing and Applied Sciences.

Both undergraduate and graduate students will have access to a product lifecycle management (PLM) software used by more than 140,000 companies throughout the global manufacturing industry — including 35 in South Carolina — to design, develop and manufacture some of the world’s most sophisticated products in a variety of industries.

This academic partnership will help students compete for jobs throughout the world and aid in building a workforce equipped with the skills needed for the high-tech jobs of tomorrow. “Preparing students to be highly competitive in the 21st century global economy is a central part of Clemson’s mission, and this new partnership with Siemens will provide our students with access to cutting-edge technical tools that can make them even more attractive to future employers — especially many of the world-class, advanced manufacturing companies operating in South Carolina,” said Clemson President Jim Clements. Kevin Yates, a 1989 Clemson alumnus and head of Siemens energy management division, said, “I am proud that Siemens is providing students with access to this software, positioning the University at the forefront of innovation and technology.

This partnership is rooted in a shared commitment to innovation and collaboration, and will allow Clemson — and South Carolina — to build a pipeline of skilled talent for the state’s growing manufacturing industry.” Clemson’s dedication to technology and innovation makes the University an ideal recipient for the in-kind software grant. With the University’s vision to create a high-tech collaborative environment through the Watt Family Innovation Center, Clemson shares Siemens’ commitment to fostering innovation, advancing technology and developing the next-generation workforce. To learn more about students using Siemens software, go to clemson.world and click on “Clemson Forever.”

Snow family to match up to $1 million to complete student recreation center

They may not have graduated from Clemson, but you wouldn’t know it from the orange in their wardrobe and the generosity they exhibit. David and Lynette Snow of Darien, Connecticut, who donated $2.4 million toward the intramural field complex on Hartwell Lake, have pledged an additional $1 million in matching funds to complete the project.

The Snows, whose daughter Ashley graduated from Clemson in 2015, became the most generous non-alumni Clemson parents in University history with their original gift. This fundraising challenge money will go toward adding new playing fields, facilities and educational areas to the recreation center.

“Lynette, our whole family and I continue to see how a world-class outdoor wellness and fitness center at Clemson will transform not only intramural activity on campus but have a daily impact on the lives of Clemson students and the surrounding community,” said David Snow. “We hope our gift doesn’t just raise awareness of this campaign, but inspires everyone to support Clemson. No gift is too small when we are working to enhance and transform the lives of Clemson students.”

In addition to the intramural fields, the center allows students to enjoy water and beach activities, and several student club sports are located there. It also offers the Clemson community amenities to enjoy year-round.

Join the Snow Family Challenge.