Norville Family Makes Transformational Gift to CECAS

Mitch and Carla Norville have been loyal supporters of Clemson since the 1980s. They have faithfully given back to the University they love, strengthening programs and initiatives in both academics and athletics. Throughout the years the Norvilles have been instrumental in helping Clemson and its students thrive.

Now, they are showing their support once again with a transformational $2.5 million gift to the College of Engineering, Computing and Applied Sciences. With this, Mitch and Carla Norville became the eighth Cornerstone partner for the University and the first for CECAS.

Past contributions from the Norville family include a gift that created the Ernest R. Norville Endowed Chair in Biomedical Engineering, named in honor of Mitch Norville’s father, and significant contributions to IPTAY, including the Norville Family Gate at the West End Zone of Memorial Stadium.

Since the first degrees were granted in 1896, Clemson engineers and scientists have made significant contributions to our state, our nation and the world. Recognized as South Carolina’s leader in educating engineers, Clemson’s College of Engineering, Computing and Applied Sciences places high priority on state-of-the art facilities, student scholarships and endowed professorships. The Norville family’s gift will go a long way toward making sure those priorities are met.

Focusing on the three areas as outlined by Dean Anand Gramopadhye, the gift provides flexibility and adaptability as the priorities evolve and change over the years, ensuring CECAS will continue preparing students to be intellectual leaders who can tackle tomorrow’s challenges.

Gramopadhye calls the Norvilles’ gift forward thinking: “As our first Academic Cornerstone partners, they are paving the way for others. Great talent, exceptional facilities and cutting-edge programming leading to impactful experiences are the three ingredients for success in academia. The Norvilles’ gift brings together all three.”

Mitch Norville graduated from Clemson in 1980 with a degree in mechanical engineering. He retired as chief operating offi-cer of Boston Properties and is the owner of Atlantic South Development Inc. His willingness to give back to his alma mater has resulted in leadership roles within the Clemson University Foundation, where he is the immediate past chair and continues to serve on the board of directors.