When In … Fort Collins

Hello! I’m Hannah Halusker ’17, M ’20, a two-time Clemson alumna who now works in science communications at Colorado State University.

Last year, I traded the Appalachians for the Rockies and moved west to Fort Collins, Colorado. Boasting 300 days of sunshine per year and situated in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, Fort Collins is the “Choice City” that many outdoor enthusiasts, like me, call home. Welcome to FoCo!

 

1Poudre Canyon

Starting high up in Rocky Mountain National Park and emerging just north of Fort Collins, the Cache la Poudre River drops 7,000 feet in elevation as it winds through Poudre Canyon. My first Colorado hikes took place on the canyon trails shared with campers, fly fishermen, rafters and kayakers alike.

 

2Bike Paths

When I moved to Fort Collins, a co-worker told me that there are two requirements for living here: owning a bike and owning a dog. I’m still working on the latter, though the bike paths in town are enough to stay occupied. Fort Collins is one of five platinum-rated bike-friendly communities in the U.S., with over 200 miles of dedicated bike lanes and 50 miles of marked or signed bike routes to explore.

 

3Horsetooth Reservoir

Named after the mountain that forms its western edge, the reservoir is surrounded by 1,900 acres of public lands — a go-to for boating, swimming, biking and rock climbing.

FUN FACT: Much of the water provided to eastern Colorado is diverted from the Western Slope under the Continental Divide and through a system of dams and canals. Water rights and conservation are hot topics as water becomes a more precious resource.

 

4Old Town

Put on the map when the railroad came to town in 1877, present-day Old Town was the business district of historic Fort Collins. Today, it’s the place to go for a night out, with more than 80 restaurants to choose from.

PRO TIP: Get an ice cream cone from Churn, a shop designed after an antique ice cream churn bucket, and stop into Sense of Place for a gift to take home.

 

 

5Breweries

The Napa Valley of Beer, the Brewmuda Triangle, the Craft Beer Capital of Colorado — there’s something about that Rocky Mountain water that attracts breweries to Fort Collins. The city ranks fourth in the nation for number of microbreweries per capita, with some of the big names including New Belgium Brewing, Anheuser-Busch and Odell Brewing Company.

 

Interested in sharing the best eats and secret spots of your own city with fellow Tigers? Email shutto@clemson.edu for more information.

 

 

The Power of Scholarships

 

It has been just over a year since Billy and Ann Powers made the largest gift in Clemson’s history to the College of Business, making a difference in the lives of Clemson students, faculty and staff. The Wilbur O. and Ann Powers College of Business is garnering national recognition for innovative programming, collaborative partnerships, and outstanding learning opportunities both in the classroom and the workplace.

A portion of the Powers family’s gift created a flexible endowment to ensure that every deserving student has access to these amazing learning opportunities for generations to come. This year, funds from the endowment provided $60,000 in merit- and need-based awards to 30 business students.

Courtney Brunson is one of those students. The management major from Florence, South Carolina, plans to graduate in December 2022 and pursue a career in human resources. Brunson explains that becoming a Powers Scholar is an honor that relieves the financial pressure during those important final semesters of study. She says, “I am so grateful to receive this scholarship because my parents and I work very hard all year to be able to afford for me to go to Clemson.”

Her love for Clemson and the gratitude Brunson feels toward the Powers family have inspired her to give back someday when she is able. She plans to use her Clemson degree to impact her community by participating in the Clemson Alumni Association, where she hopes to encourage and promote education and professional development. She says, “I am so proud and happy to be a part of the Wilbur O. and Ann Powers College of Business. With this scholarship, I am determined to represent the College to the best of my ability through academic success and community service.”

 

The Roaring10 2020 Nominees

 

Young Alumni Council recognizes its 2020 nominees

 

The Roaring10 honor is given to individuals who exemplify the University’s core values of honesty, integrity and respect. Each year, 10 outstanding young alumni are recognized by the Young Alumni Council for their impact in business, leadership, community, educational and/or philanthropic endeavors.

 

The Roaring10 Class of 2020 were recognized in Fall 2021:

Brittany M. Hall ’11
certified nurse-midwife, Easley, S.C.

Caroline Aneskievich ’10, ’11, M ’15
BMW Group’s talent management specialist for the Americas, Greenville

Josh Tew ’10, M ’14
commercial real estate, Pintail Capital Partners, Greenville

Edwin Sabuhoro Ph.D. ’18
assistant professor in both the Department of Recreation, Park and Tourism Management and the African Studies Program at Penn State University,
State College, Penn.

Dorothy H. Askins ’17
anesthesiology resident at Tulane University, New Orleans

Ansley Cartee Minor ’17
co-owner of Carolina Superstars Baton and Dance, Anderson, S.C.

Rebecca Leigh Stratford ’10
laboratory manager at the Blanchfield Army Community Hospital, Clarksville, Tenn.

Spencer C. McLeod ’12, M ’14
operations manager for McLeod Farms, McBee, S.C.

Jordan M. Burns ’12
financial adviser and field director at Northwestern Mutual, Greenville

Lauren Harroff Trondsen ’12
Citywise Advisory Services, Sanergy, Ithaca, N.Y.

 

Club News

Crab Feast

The Baltimore/D.C. Clemson Club held their 19th Crab Feast on August 7, 2021, hosted by Cindy ’90 and Mark ’91 Derrick and their family. “It was a very memorable day for our Clemson Club members and guests as we appreciated being able to gather again in person to enjoy each other’s company and plenty of crabs!” wrote club president Rachael Wiker ’00.

 

Funds for Food

The Villages Chapter of the Central Florida Clemson Club secured their third-straight first-place trophy for the Funds for Food annual food drive. The chapter raised $12,359.25. “My husband, Riley, would have been proud of our ‘little ole Clemson Club’ beating Ohio State and Penn State and all the others again!” wrote chapter president Amy Huckaby ’79. “Club member Bob Bienvenue and his extremely talented drumline led us around the square and to victory for our first-ever first-place spirit award!”

 

Clemson Family Tailgate

Tigers from all over the country gathered in Pittsburgh to cheer on Clemson Football and to celebrate Clemson’s first visit to Pittsburgh since the University of Pittsburgh joined the ACC Conference. Upon arrival on Friday evening, members of the Clemson Family gathered at Federal Galley in Pittsburgh’s North Shore for a Welcome to Pittsburgh event.

Prior to the game on Saturday, 400 Tigers set sail with the Clemson Alumni Association, IPTAY and the Gateway Clipper Fleet for the first-ever floating Clemson Family Tailgate. Guests enjoyed a sailing tour of Pittsburgh on The Empress and a Pittsburgh barbecue feast.

 

Orange Shoe Event

 

Fall gathering kicks off Fall Into Fitness Challenge

 

The Women’s Alumni Council held their second Orange Shoe Event on the night of September 10, 2021, in the courtyard at the Inn at Patrick Square following its annual Fall Meeting. The council also collected donations for the Paw Pantry, Career Closet and the ClemsonLIFE program. In addition to the Fall Meeting, the council held a blood drive for the Blood Connection during the afternoon. There were 23 donors, and the Blood Connection gave a donation to the WAC Scholarship Endowment for each donor.

At the Orange Shoe Event, attendees enjoyed perusing tables full of silent auction items and milling about the front lawn area of the Inn at Patrick Square, which was transformed into a large tailgate, complete with helmet blow-ups, tents, chairs and outdoor games. The Tiger mascot entertained the crowd, and DJ Sha  kept everyone dancing with music throughout the night. Boulevard Catering also provided food and beverages. Proceeds from the silent auction went toward WAC’s scholarship endowment, which awards 10–12 scholarships to Clemson students each year; just under $5,000 was raised.

All attendees were encouraged to wear orange shoes to the event, and styles ranged from sandals to casual sneakers to high heels with orange flames. The event also kicked off WAC’s second Fall Into Fitness Challenge — Orange Shoe edition. This virtual fitness event was started last year during the pandemic. This year, participants are encouraged get active with their family and friends while sporting their orange shoes and sharing on social media.

 

Feeding a Growing State

 

McCall Farms makes $3 million gift to advance farming research

 

There are more than 25,000 farms across South Carolina, and farming is one of the state’s leading industries. It is also a primary focus of Clemson’s College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences. To help South Carolina farmers remain competitive both nationally and globally, McCall Farms is supporting Clemson with $3 million for critical research, establishing the McCall Farms Vegetable Breeding Endowment.

This endowment will support and enhance the vegetable breeding program within the college, specifically as part of the Advanced Plant Technology program. The program uses genomics-assisted breeding to develop improved vegetable varieties for production in the Southern United States. The APT program involves a statewide network of researchers supporting crop breeding and genetics in the Clemson University Agricultural Experiment Station.

Current projects in the vegetable breeding program include improving heat tolerance in green beans and disease resistance in leafy greens, muskmelon and watermelon.

The program, led by Stephen Kresovich, the Robert and Lois Coker Trustees Endowed Chair of Genetics, has made significant advancements to both the intellectual and operational capabilities of the University in crop agriculture. Improvements have been made in upgrading the research facilities at the Pee Dee Research and Education Center as well as other research and education centers across the state. Meanwhile, Clemson has hired some of the best and brightest new faculty for research positions at the RECs as well as the main campus. Funds from the McCall endowment will provide continuing support to this and other important research, improve equipment, provide supplies, and fund technical personnel salaries and graduate student research assistantships.

“Our research helps the more than 25,000 farms located throughout South Carolina in a variety of areas, including specialty crops, responding to weather and environmental changes, modernizing technology and field practices, and managing invasive species,” says President Jim Clements. “I am incredibly grateful to McCall Farms and the Swink family for their generous support. This donation will make a tremendous impact on farming across the state and beyond.”

Located in Effingham, South Carolina, McCall Farms understands the need for crop diversification and catering to consumer tastes. They established a canning operation in 1954 and work with a network of farmers throughout the state. They have several national brands of fruits and vegetables that are staples in kitchens across the country. McCall Farms is owned by Henry Swink ’68 and Marion Swink ’72 and operated by Woody Swink ’00, McCall Swink ’98 and Thomas Hunter ’06 — all Clemson alumni.

“While South Carolina farmers are some of the most efficient and productive in the world,” says CAFLS Dean Keith Belli, “this partnership with McCall Farms will be a catalyst for CAFLS’ efforts to provide research, teaching and Extension programs that continue to support the state’s agriculture industry as we tackle the challenge of sustainably feeding a growing state and global population.”

 

 

Miller Family Becomes Newest Athletic Cornerstone Partner

 

The Westzone Club in Memorial Stadium has a new name. Lewis and Ree Miller of Spartanburg, South Carolina, recently gave a $2.5 million gift to Clemson Athletics, becoming the 16th Athletic Cornerstone Partners. In recognition of the Miller family’s donation, the WestZone Club in Memorial Stadium has been named the Lewis and Marie Miller Family WestZone Club.

“Clemson Athletics and IPTAY continue to remain leaders within intercollegiate athletics because of the extreme generosity of people like Lewis and Ree Miller,” says IPTAY CEO Davis Babb. “We are very appreciative of the commitment they have made to our student-athletes and our growing athletic program. Their gift will advance the initiatives within our athletic department providing a world-class student-athlete experience for our young men and women who wear the Paw.”

Lewis Miller earned his Bachelor of Science in industrial management from Clemson in 1971. As a student, he was actively involved in intramural sports and his fraternity, Kappa Sigma. He spent his career with the Southeastern Paper Group, where he began as a warehouse manager and worked his way to the role of CEO. Until being sold to NW Synergy in December 2020, Southeastern Paper was a third-generation family- and veteran-owned business headquartered in Spartanburg.

“As a Clemson alumnus, I take great pride in wearing the Tiger Paw and sharing the love of the Clemson Family,” says Miller. “We are honored to make this gift to Clemson in support of our talented student-athletes and all that they embody. Ree and I look forward to witnessing the continued success of current and future Tigers in all phases of their collegiate journeys.”

Ree Miller is a graduate of Winthrop University and is active in the Spartanburg community. Serving others is a priority for the Millers. They support the Hope Center for Children and Project Hope, which provides a lifespan of services for the autism community. Lewis Miller also sits on the board of directors for the Mountainview Nursing Home.

“We are grateful for the Miller Family and their unwavering support of Clemson athletics,” says former Director of Athletics Dan Radakovich. “Memorial Stadium is a special place on our campus. I am excited that their family will forever be a part of the facility with the naming of the Lewis and Marie Miller Family WestZone Club. Their gift will significantly impact our student-athletes for years to come, providing resources for them to be champions in competition and the classroom.”