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Scotland: Stuart Waldo M ’98

Stuart Waldo M ’98 and his family took a trip to Scotland (Sept 10-17, 2018) and toured a number of historic sites and castles. “This photo is of Urquhart Castle on Loch Ness, just south of Inverness, Scotland,” says Waldo. “The castle dates to the 13th century. If you look real close, maybe you can see Nessie in the water off in the distance.”

Ireland: Arthur ’05, M ’18 and Lindsay ’05 Yon

Arthur ’05, M ’18 and Lindsay ’05 Yon traveled to the Republic of Ireland in July 2018 “to watch our niece’s choir sing and to tour the country. This is a photo of us at Trim Castle, a large Norman castle built in the 12th century. The castle is a cultural landmark and was featured in parts of the film Braveheart.”

Germany: Shannon Fisher ’13, Jorge Rodriguez, Carson Joye ’15, Elizabeth Zanin ’17, Zach Hadock ’17, Chris Lane ’18, Zack Thomson ’18, Lucas Staccioli ’16, Bill O’Connell ’16 and George Rawls ’17

Shannon Fisher ’13, Jorge Rodriguez, professor of mechanical and bioengineering, Carson Joye ’15, Elizabeth Zanin ’17, Zach Hadock ’17, Chris Lane ’18, Zack Thomson ’18, Lucas Staccioli ’16, Bill O’Connell ’16 and George Rawls ’17 all traveled to Germany on a study abroad trip focused on studying sustainable energy and exploring German culture.

Championship Legacy: Sons Make Winning a Family Affair

Perry Tuttle isn’t the only 1981 champion lucky enough to have his son follow in his footsteps. There are four other players on the current roster with ties to the 1981 team: twin sophomore linebackers J.D. and Judah Davis, sons of 1981 team captain Jeff Davis; Jarvis Magwood, a redshirt sophomore linebacker and son of wide receiver Frank Magwood; and Cannon Smith, a redshirt sophomore tight end and son
of defensive end Bill Smith.

TWO NAMED HONORARY ALUMNI

Each fall, the alumni association considers bestowing the title of honorary  alumnus on individuals who have been nominated because of their service, loyalty and devotion to Clemson and/or the Alumni Association. This year, the Alumni Association honored JoVanna King and Frank Inabnit III. While neither has crossed the stage to receive a Clemson diploma, their lives and actions demonstrate that their blood runs orange.

King is senior director of estate planning and principal gifts at Clemson. For more than 25 years she has raised money to support the University. She has worked on all three of Clemson’s capital campaigns including the recently completed Will to Lead campaign, which raised more than $1 billion. According to Vice President for Development and Alumni Relations Brian O’Rourke, King has been involved in raising more philanthropic dollars than any other employee of the University. According to President Emeritus Jim Barker, the dollars don’t tell the whole story. “The dollars are impressive,” he wrote in his nomination letter, “but it is the lives of Clemson students and faculty that motivate her.”

Inabnit, a resident of Jacksonville, Florida, is retired after a career in electrical drafting and programming. The son of a 1941 alumnus, he was born deaf andwas unable to attend Clemson. “He has spent his entire life in a silent world,” wrote his sister, Catherine Inabnit, in her nomination. “He has never heard the word ‘Clemson.’ He’s never heard the ‘Tiger Rag’ or the Clemson Alma Mater, but Clemson has been a very important part of his life and occupies a large and special place in his heart.”

A loyal IPTAY member for 45 years, Inabnit has served as an IPTAY representative and has contributed to the Alumni Association for more than 25 years.

Nominations for honorary alumnus will open in the fall; for more information, go to clemson.edu/alumni and click on “Awards and Honors.”

Former President Max Lennon, 1940 – 2016

Archie Max Lennon, the 11th president of Clemson University, died on November 29, 2016.

A native North Carolinian, Lennon was born in Columbus County on September 27, 1940, to Denver H. and Mary Kelly Lennon. He attended Mars Hills College, graduating with an associate degree in agriculture, before going on to earn a bachelor of science at North Carolina State, where he returned to complete a Ph.D. in 1970.

Positions in academia included Texas Tech, University of Missouri-Columbia and Ohio State before he accepted the presidency of Clemson in 1986.

Lennon led the University’s first multimillion dollar capital campaign, which was responsible for raising more than $101 million. During his presidency, Clemson experienced unprecedented growth and success in research and private fundraising. The University’s research expenditures quadrupled and academic fundraising more than tripled.

President Lennon also advanced the concept of strategic planning at the University, which led to the identification of Universitywide priorities and goals, and a process for restructuring the University for the 21st century. His impact on campus can still be seen in projects and infrastructure such as the Brooks Center, Sullivan Wellness Center, Hunter Laboratory, Garrison Arena and the Fluor Daniel Building. His influence also exists in programs such as Communication Across the Curriculum and the University’s partnership with the Greenville Hospital System, as well as in the establishment of degree programs such as packaging science and landscape architecture.

After resigning in 1994, Lennon worked briefly with Eastern Foods, then accepted the presidency of Mars Hill College in 1995, where he served until 2002, when he resigned and became president of the Education and Research Consortium of the Western Carolinas.

He is survived by his wife Ruth and two children, Daniel R. Lennon ’91 and Robin Lennon Bylenga M ’91, and grandchildren.

*Clemson will host a Celebration of Life service at 2 p.m. Dec. 13 at the President’s Box in Memorial Stadium on the main campus.